new and Emerging Technology News part 206 ~ NEW GEN TECH LIFE : new generation technology news

Tuesday, 11 March 2014

new and Emerging Technology News part 206

Spectrolab has achieved a record 37.8 percent efficiency with a new multi-junction solar c...
Spectrolab, a Boeing subsidiary known for the manufacture of solar cells for satellites and spacecraft, has in recent years turned its attention to terrestrial solar cells to tap into the expanding alternative energy market. Now the California-based company has claimed a new solar cell efficiency record of 37.8 percent for a ground-based multi-junction cell without solar concentration.  Read More
D-Haus's folding and unfolding D-Table The designers behind the transforming D-Dynamic concept house have applied the same principle to a designer coffee table launching on Kickstarter.  Read More
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The FireWriter is a handheld printer that burns pictures onto wood with a torch, while an ... For the most part, printing out an image on an inkjet printer is a pretty mundane task – unless you add fire of course. That's exactly what Lucien Langton, a student at ECAL (Ecole cantonale d'art de Lausanne), did when he built the FireWriter, a handheld printer that burns pictures onto wood with a torch, while an optical sensor keeps track of the image's positioning.  Read More
Artist's concept of a Phantom Phoenix Satellite
One problem with satellites is that they’re either one-offs or part of a constellation of a single, costly design. Both can be expensive and neither lends itself to getting a specialized satellite into orbit quickly and on a budget. Boeing’s answer to this is a kit car class of a small satellites called Phantom Phoenix that are relatively easy to customize and economical to launch.  Read More
The 2013 James Dyson Award is now accepting entries It’s that time of year again when university students need to start thinking about finalizing the designs of their world-changing concepts so they’re ready for submission to the annual James Dyson Award.  Read More
The Jerrycan offers 18.5 liters (4.9 gallons) of water-purifying and carrying capacity
The LIFESAVER Jerrycan is a large water purification jug that could be of great use to everyone from campers to inhabitants of remote villages. The Jerrycan incorporates a built-in filtration system which can purify 18.5 liters (4.9 gallons) of water at a time, along with an integrated shower attachment that lets you use the water for cleaning as well as drinking.  Read More
Selling the iPhone in multiple screen sizes could be the best thing that ever happened to ...
Apple likes simplicity. It has a simple product line with simple brand names, simple designs and simple-to-use software. This obsession has served the company well. But there is one area where it could afford to have a bit more complexity. I’m talking iPhone screen size. Apple’s rivals have shown that one size most definitely does not fit all. It’s time for Apple to join them and stop pretending that it does.  Read More
Laser Weapon System (LaWS) temporarily installed aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS D...
The U.S. Navy took a step farther away from John Paul Jones and closer to James T. Kirk as it announced that a solid-state laser weapon will be deployed on a U.S. Navy ship in fiscal year 2014. The announcement that the Laser Weapon System (LaWS) will deployed on board USS Ponce (AFSB[I] 15) two years ahead of schedule was made on Monday at the Sea-Air-Space exposition, National Harbor, Maryland. The deployment is the latest in a line of recent recent high-energy laser demonstrations carried out by the Office of Naval Research (ONR) and Naval Sea Systems Command.  Read More

Harvard's spleen-on-a-chip blood filtration device
The spleen’s job is to filter our blood. When people are critically ill or have received traumatic injuries, however, the spleen alone is sometimes not able to remove enough of the pathogens on its own – potentially-fatal sepsis is the result. In order to help avert such an outcome in those situations, scientists from the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University are developing a device known as the spleen-on-a-chip.  Read More
The newly-launched Kodak PIXPRO Astro Zoom AZ361 bridge camera
Early last year, the Eastman Kodak Company announced the phase out and cessation of all its "dedicated capture devices." Citing the rise in quality of smartphone cameras, Kodak-branded cameras looked set to be consigned to the history books ... until a Los Angeles company called JK Imaging signed a brand licensing deal in January 2013 that would see the globally-recognized Kodak name emblazoned on a new wave of digital imaging devices. The first of the new PIXPRO line to emerge is the Astro Zoom AZ361 bridge camera.  Read More

Scientists have used Deep Brain Stimulation to successfully treat patients suffering from ...
Deep Brain Stimulation, in which a pacemaker-like device activates select regions of the brain via implanted electrodes, has been used to help people suffering from a variety of neurological problems. Just in the past few years, studies have explored its use for treating anorexia, Alzheimer’s, and memory disorders. Now, perhaps not surprisingly, scientists from Germany’s Bonn University Hospital have found that it also appears to do wonders for acute depression.  Read More
The Panasonic LUMIX DMC-GF6 is the first interchangeable lens camera to feature NFC
Panasonic has revealed its latest GF Series camera, the LUMIX DMC-GF6. With the addition of easier access to manual controls and a chunkier body, the new mirrorless digital camera looks set to take the series in a slightly more enthusiast direction. However, the standout feature of the GF6 is undoubtedly its wireless capabilities, which include Wi-Fi connectivity with NFC technology – meaning users can easily connect the camera to a smartphone/tablet with a simple touch.  Read More
You might not want to hold your breath for Office on iOS or Android
Apple often speaks of a “post PC era.” Microsoft talks about a “PC plus era.” Each company is framing the future around its strengths, so believe what you will. Whether post or plus, though, mobile computing is here to stay. And if Microsoft wants Office to remain the industry standard, it'll eventually need to offer it on the biggest mobile platforms. Just don't hold your breath for that.  Read More
The Multi-Angle Snowflake Camera, or MASC, is able to capture 3D photos of individual snow...
Falling snow can play havoc with radar systems, so the more that we know about the manner in which snow falls, the better that those systems can be equipped to compensate for it. That’s why for the past three years, researchers from the University of Utah have been developing a device known as the Multi-Angle Snowflake Camera – or MASC. Using three cameras and two motion sensors, it captures 3D photos of snowflakes in free-fall.  Read More
David Neevel's Email guitar
I must confess that the more time I spend tapping away on a computer keyboard, the more my guitars sit ignored and unplayed in the corner. This is also something that troubled Wieden+Kennedy's David Neevel. Unlike me though, he decided to do something about it. With a little help from a Roland GR-33 guitar synth, an Arduino Uno, some electronics and custom code, he managed to trick his laptop into treating his Flying V as if it was a standard keyboard input.  Read More
The GT-R captures Russia's ice speed record
The Nissan GT-R really didn't need a new speed record to remind us that it's a lotta car for a little buck – we remember that every time we look at its specs. But, in conjunction with LAV Productions company, Nissan went ahead and brought a specially outfitted GT-R to one of the coldest, least hospitable places on earth – Siberia – and returned with a new ice speed record.  Read More
The Victorinox Swiss Army Bike Tool Long before the Leatherman ever existed, the Swiss Army Knife became one of the first commercially-produced multi-tools. Now, no doubt aware of the increasing popularity of cycling-specific multi-tools, Victorinox has introduced its Swiss Army Bike Tool.  Read More
The 630-MW London Array is now online and generating
Phase one of the London Array usurped the UK's Greater Gabbard to become the largest operational offshore wind farm in the world when its final turbine (its 175th) was commissioned on Saturday afternoon. Though construction was completed back in December, it is only now that all of the farm's turbines are supplying the UK's national grid with electrical power. The array has a total capacity of 630 MW.  Read Mores
The 'artificial leaf' created by Daniel G. Nocera, Ph.D. and his team now has self-healing...
Back in 2011, scientists reported the creation of the “world’s first practical artificial leaf” that mimics the ability of real leaves to produce energy from sunlight and water. Touted as a potentially inexpensive source of electricity for those in developing countries and remote areas, the leaf’s creators have now given it a capability that would be especially beneficial in such environments – the ability to self heal and therefore produce energy from dirty water.  Read More
2014 Maserati Ghibli on show in Shanghai
Way back in 1966, Maserati came to the Turin Auto Show with a new performance GT in hand. Sculpted by design legend Giorgetto Giugiaro the awkwardly named Ghibli, a long of nose GT, was one of Maserati’s great successes in the 60s. After several questionable attempts to bring the name back in various forms, Maserati is set to release a redefined Ghibli – this time in sedan form.  Read More


 NVIRONMENT
Fujitsu has developed a new recycling system to make new front panels for notebook compute...
Although optical drives in consumer notebooks are becoming less common nowadays and we are storing more and more of our digital information on hard drives instead of optical discs, CD/DVD players are still a mainstay of desktop computers and business laptops and new systems often come bundled with discs containing all sorts of never-to-be-used software. With the help of its Laboratories Division, Fujitsu has developed a new recycling system to make new front panels for notebook computers from all the discarded CDs and DVDs collected, sorted and recycled by its five recycling centers across Japan.  Read More
From left to right: iPhone 4/S Cell case, Maze case and Fingerprint case designsAs 3D printing technology matures and becomes more affordable, it is being implemented in the production of an increasing variety of projects, such asfirearms and burritos. Singapore-based 3D printing and design company Polychemy continues this trend with the release of a striking new series of cases suitable for iPhone, iPhone 4S and Blackberry.  Read More
The Martin Jetpack is now regularly being flown at speeds of 50 km/h (31 mph)
When we first covered the Martin Jetpack back in March, 2010, the creators were hoping to get it on the backs of buyers sometime in 2011. While 2011 has come and gone, the New Zealand-based Martin Aircraft Company is continuing test flights and is now seeking investors to help bring the manned Jetpack to market in mid 2013.  Read More
Clopen being used as both a shelf and a drawerWhen burglars enter a home their first instinct is to look for the place where the valuables are kept. In most homes this is a safe or some other secure installation. With luck the safe will protect the valuables contained therein, but experienced burglars will know what to do to extricate either the safe itself or the precious items it's shielding from prying eyes. However, there could be another way of keeping your valuables safe - storing them in the last place a burglar is likely to look. This is where Clopen could come into its own.  Read More
Wave Glider robots are being deployed as part of an extensive marine life tracking network...
If you’ve ever sat in a beach-side coffee house wondered if there was a white shark in the vicinity, then wonder no more because now there’s an app for that. A team of Stanford University researchers lead by Prof. Barbara Block is deploying a fleet of static buoys and Wave Glider robots to turn the waters off the coast of San Francisco into a huge Wi-Fi network to track tagged fish and animals. This will allow scientists to better understand sea life movements, but the project also includes offering a free app to the public that will allow them to track northern California white sharks on their tablets and smartphones.  Read More
The Type 26 Global Combat Ship (T26 GCS) that is due to enter service with the Royal Navy ...The U.K.’s Ministry of Defence (MOD) has unveiled its new multi-mission warship - the Type 26 Global Combat Ship (T26 GCS). Due to replace the thirteen Type 23 frigates in Britain’s Royal Navy when it enters service in after 2020, the T26 GCS has been in development by the MOD and BAE Systems since 2010 and is intended for use in combat and counter-piracy operations as well as supporting humanitarian and disaster relief work around the world.  Read More
The Signal Snowboards fly fishing board provides entertainment throughout the year
The melting of the last high-alpine ribbons of snow in late spring and early summer leaves a massive void in the hearts of skiers and snowboarders. They instinctively look to non-snow outdoor activities to fill that emptiness. Since snow melts into running water and some ski towns double as world class fly fishing destinations, fly fishing is a natural choice. And this Signal Snowboards prototype board with integrated fly rod could be the natural weapon of choice.  Read More
Researchers have reportedly restored near-normal vision to blind mice, using a prosthesis ...
Retinal prostheses such as the Argus IIBio-Retina and the Retina Implant AG microchip all work – more or less – by stimulating the retina’s ganglion cells with light-induced electrical signals. The images produced in the patient’s visual cortex tend to be quite rudimentary, however. This is partially because the rate at which the signals are sent isn’t the same as the rate of neural impulses normally produced by a retina. Now, researchers have deciphered the neural code used by mouse ganglion cells, and used it to create a prosthesis that reportedly restores normal vision to blind mice. They have additionally deciphered the neural code of monkeys, which is close to that used by humans, so a device for use by blind people could also be on the way.  Read More
Collecting plastic nurdles with the 'Nurdler'
You may have heard about the huge floating islands of garbage swirling around in the middle of the Earth's oceans. Much of that waterlogged rubbish is made up of plastic and, like Electrolux with its concept vacuum cleaners, U.K.-based Studio Swine and Kieren Jones are looking to put that waste to good use. As part of an ambitious project, they’ve come up with a system to collect plastic debris and convert it into furniture.  Read More
Horticultural-themed zombie defense game Plants vs. Zombies is set to return with a sequel...Get your Cob Cannon locked and loaded, because the sequel to cross-platform zombie defense oddity Plants vs. Zombies is due to launch in the first half of 2013, with "late Spring [Northern Hemisphere]" cited as the likely release window. While details on the game are still rather thin on the ground at present, Plants vs. Zombiescreator PopCap Games teased that the title will feature "Hordes of New Plant and Zombie Types and Mulch More" – all of which should suffice to whet the appetite of horticultural zombie slayers.  Read More
A chemical engineer has created a 'food biorefinery' that converts used coffee grounds and...
Every year, the individual stores that make up Starbucks Hong Kongproduce almost 5,000 tonnes (4,536 tons) of used coffee grounds and unconsumed bakery items. As it stands now, all of that waste is incinerated, dumped in a landfill, or composted. In the future, however, it may be used to produce a key ingredient in laundry detergents, plastics, and many other items. A recent experiment showed that it can indeed be done.  Read More
Artist's concept of the ACTUV in action (Image: DARPA)
Submarine combat may seem like an obsolete relic from World War II films and Cold War thrillers, but the past 20 years have seen a growing number of increasingly quiet diesel-electric submarines turning up in some very unfriendly navies. In order to counter this threat, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has awarded a contract to the Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) of McLean, Virginia to develop unmanned submarine hunters capable of operating for months on end without human intervention.  Read More
The Isoteko bicycle helmet mirror is designed to be unobtrusive and good-looking
According to the U.S. Department of Transportation, collisions between bicycles and motor vehicles resulted in the deaths of 618 cyclists in 2010 ... and that’s just in the United States. Regardless of who was at fault in those accidents, one thing is certain – urban cyclists are safer when they’re better able to keep tabs on the vehicles around them. While helmet-mounted mirrors are a great help in that regard, many cyclists don’t use them. That’s why Canadian entrepreneurs Greg Maxwell and Richard Seck invented the Isoteko mirror.  Read More
Ergo Electronics has launched a new budget-friendly ICS touchscreen netbook just in time t...
Thanks to Google, whenever we hear someone mention Ice Cream Sandwich we automatically think of recently released tablets or smartphones. Now there's another mobile computing format to consider with the launch of Ergo Electronics' GoNote, the UK's first touchscreen Android hybrid netbook. Pitched as the perfect modern homework companion and playtime buddy for students about to return to school, the budget-friendly device features a full-size chiclet keyboard and trackpad, and also brings touchscreen functionality to the form factor. If you'd rather opt for a cheap tablet, the company has also launched a new ICS tablet called the GoTab Epic V.  Read More
The Sony Exmor RS image sensors use a stacked structure, which means they are more compact...Sony has revealed its new range of Exmor RS image sensors and camera modules which could be winging their way into your next smartphone or tablet. The CMOS sensors, which will also feature in devices from rival manufacturers, use a newly-developed "stacked structure" which means they are not only more compact, but also boast better image quality and advanced functionality.  Read More
Artist's concept of InSight on Mars (image: JPL/NASA)
Feeling very confident after the perfect landing of the Curiosity rover on Mars on August 6th, NASA has announced its next mission to the Red Planet. In 2016, the US space agency will launch the unmanned InSight lander to Mars. Unlike Curiosity, InSight will be a static lander loaded with instruments designed to study the deep geology of Mars and answer such questions as whether the core of the planet is liquid or solid, and why Mars hasn’t any shifting tectonic plates like Earth.  Read More
The impressive subterranean Dark Knight home cinema incorporates a dramatic interpretation...
This extravagant Dark Knight-inspired home theater is the latest concept design by Elite Home Theater Seating. The Canadian company is better known for manufacturing luxury theater seating, but has also designed several themed home theaters including a traditional Batcave and a Pirates of the Caribbean ship.  Read More
Spot the mystery visitorStockholm-based architectural studio Jägnefält Milton has unveiled Black Lodge, a conceptual low-tech reclusive escape designed specifically for the luxury resort of Furillen on the Swedish island of Gotland in the Baltic Sea. Pyramid in form, the lower sections of each side open up to create what designer Konrad Milton described to Gizmag as "more of a campfire situation."  Read More
McLaren X1 customer concept car
The Pebble Beach Concours at Monterey is used to seeing the weird and wonderful creations of bespoke vehicle design and craftsmanship, but one of the most surprising entrants this year was from the McLaren Special Operations team. The vehicle, known as the X1 Concept, is an extraordinary mixture of McLaren MP12C road car and an entirely new bodyshell crafted in a style that wouldn't look out of place in a 1930s comic book. Before you imagine that McLaren has hit the crazy button, a little explanation is in order.  Read More
Still from an Aerofex test flight video
Videos released by California-based tech research company Aerofexappear to show successful test flights of a prototype hover bike that gains lift from two large ducted rotors, similar in principle to Chris Malloy's Hoverbike prototype we've previously covered. Aeroflex claims its hover bike allows the pilot intuitive control over pitch, roll and yaw without need of artificial intelligence, flight software or electronics of any kind.  Read More

Left shows galaxies from AREPO simulation, right shows actual galaxies from Hubble image (...
A new approach for simulating the birth and evolution of galaxies and cosmic filaments within the Universe has been developed by researchers at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics together with their colleagues at the Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies. It's called AREPO, and has been used to simulate the evolution of our Universe from only 380,000 years after the Big Bang to the present. The full variety of spiral, elliptical, peculiar, and dwarf galaxies appear in the simulated Universe.  Read More
Cloud gaming service, OnLive, recently announced it had been purchased by a separate firm ...
OnLive has gained some steam in the past couple years with its impressive cloud gaming service, which allows modern games to stream instantly to almost any device. In just the past two months alone, the company has announced deals to bring the service to both LG Smart TVs and the Android-based OUYA gaming console. So it was shocking to say the least for OnLive employees to learn this past weekend that all of them were being laid off and the company had been purchased by another firm in a bid to avoid bankruptcy. As one of only two major players in the cloud gaming business and the owner of a number of patents on the technology, the news raises quite a bit of uncertainty for the future of cloud-based gaming.  Read More
Using an off-the-shelf Emotiv BCI, researchers have shown that it's possible to 'hack' a h...
Once the preserve of science fiction, brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) have advanced to the point where they can even be found in novelty headwear, which only makes an achievement of an international team of scientists more frightening. Using an off-the-shelf Emotiv BCI costing only a few hundred dollars, the team has shown that it's possible to "hack" a human brain and pull things like bank details straight out of your skull.  Read More
Some 3,000 vehicles equipped with wireless technology that allows them to communicate have...
Hot on the heels of Daimler announcing the largest ever field-test of its car-to-X vehicle communications system in Germany, a similar program being conducted by the U.S. Department of Transport (DoT) got underway this week in the Ann Arbor region of Michigan. Whereas the Daimler trial involves 120 network-linked vehicles, the Connected Vehicle Safety Pilot Model Deployment Program will see some 3,000 vehicles hitting the road in the world's biggest ever real world test of connected-vehicle communication technology.  Read More
Ecobeneficios' GreenCam app uses the computer cam to sense when the user walks away and tu...
Computing guzzles a great deal of electricity and striving for greater energy efficiency both saves money and decreases greenhouse gas emissions. Although computers already come with energy-saving mechanisms, such as sleep mode and other power saving features set by users, there's always room for improvement. This is the idea behind Ecobeneficios’s Greencam. The Brazilian company has launched a PC app that automatically turns off the user’s monitor when he or she walks away from it.  Read More
Simulated structure of buckyballs and new super-hard material (Image: Lin Wang, Carnegie I...
Diamonds may be forever, but they aren’t what they were. True, they shine just as brightly and they’re as hard as ever, but scientists from the Carnegie Institution of Washington are giving them some competition. An international team led by Carnegie’s Lin Wang have discovered a new substance that is not quite crystalline and not quite non-crystalline, yet is hard enough to dent diamonds.  Read More
A new understanding of the immune system may be paving the way for the development of a va...
Most people probably know that plaque buildup in the arteries surrounding the heart is one of the major causes of heart disease. The reason that the plaque does accumulate, however, is often due to an inflammation of the artery walls. Recently, scientists from California’s La Jolla Institute for Allergy & Immunology were able to identify the type of immune cells responsible for that inflammation. With this knowledge in hand, they now hope to be able to develop a vaccine for heart disease.  Read More
The InfinitiPipe can be manufactured on site (Image: University of Arizona)
A University of Arizona professor has invented a theoretically infinite pipe that promises to bring down the costs of laying pipelines while reducing environmental damage. Developed by Mo Ehsani, Professor Emeritus of Civil Engineering at the University of Arizona, the new pipe, called InfinitiPipe, is of a lightweight plastic aerospace honeycomb under layers of resin-saturated carbon fiber fabric put together by a new fabricating process that allows pipes to be built in indefinite lengths on site.  Read More
The Kilo GLOW from Pure Fix CyclesThe best ideas are often, but not always, the simplest ones. So while there are many ways in which a cyclist can make themselves visible to motorists and pedestrians at night-time - these LED systems that light up your rims, for instance - perhaps all that is needed is a frame that glows in the dark. Bike manufacturer Pure Fix Cycles believes so and is introducing the GLOW series, of which The Kilo is the first.  Read More

The Double docks an iPad and moves it up and down
Video calling and chat services like Skype have revolutionized the way people communicate over distances. It's now possible to have face-to-face conversations with people that are halfway around the globe - something that was pure science fiction just a few decades ago. The next step appears to be enabling more natural face-to-face communications complete with movement and body language. While we wait for a practical holographic or3D telepod system system, Double Robotics, a start-up founded last year, offers a sort of robot surrogate based around the iPad.  Read More

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