New and Emerging Technology News part 145 ~ NEW GEN TECH LIFE : new generation technology news

Sunday, 2 February 2014

New and Emerging Technology News part 145

The Pearl E ink display is readable in direct sunlight
It may not have been the first e-Reader on the market sporting E ink's electronic paper display - Sony's LIBRIĆ© claimed those bragging rights when it debuted in Japan in April 2004 - but since its launch in November 2007, Amazon's Kindle has risen to dominate the e-Reader market. In that time, it has also gone through a number of updates, including the Kindle 2, the Kindle DX, Kindle 3 and most recently, the Kindle Touch and the first Kindle without an E Ink display, the Kindle Fire. The latest updates to the line-up also saw the Kindle enter its fourth generation, and with the Touch and Fire having the lion's share of attention, we decided to turn the spotlight on the 4th-gen Kindle with a review.  Read More
Sony transforms a room into a fantasy world using the Playstation Move and no post-product...
When Sony wanted to highlight the immersiveness of movies available on the Playstation Store, they turned to UK-based agencies Studio Output and Marshmallow Laser Feast to create a series of shorts around the theme "great films fill rooms." Using the Playstation Move, the production team shot a handful of scenes depicting an ordinary man going from his couch to flying above skyscrapers as a robot and fighting sea monsters. The best part: not a single aspect of these videos was added in the editing room.  Read More
3Dconnexion has updated its 3D mice lineup with the SpaceMouse Pro
There are basically two groups of users that require the most advanced, ergonomic and multitask-capable input peripherals - hardcore gamers and professionals working with sophisticated software. 3Dconnexion has updated its lineup of 3D mice aimed at the latter group of users with the SpaceMouse Pro. The new arrival is equipped with six-degrees-of-freedom sensor for manipulating 3D objects, 15 programmable keys and an on-screen display.  Read More
The Megaphone comes in white, black, and gold and amplifies tunes from your iPhone or iPod...
Have you been looking for a speaker system for your iPhone? How about a giant megaphone instead? Not unlike the Horn Stand Amplifier on steroids, the appropriately named "Megaphone," is a giant horn that will amplify the sound from your iPhone in a way that's bound to turn at least a few heads. Essentially just a giant megaphone, the horn's design amplifies the sound from your phone rather than a speaker system, with the actual volume control being taken care of on your handset rather than on the horn.  Read More
Photograph comparing the original Stradivari Betts violin with the carved plate of the rep...
Almost three centuries after Antonio Stradivari's death he remains the greatest luthier of all times, with roughly 650 out of 1000 violins of his making still testifying to his exquisite craftsmanship. As many of the surviving instruments adorn museums and private collections, playing a Stradivarius violin is a privilege reserved for few and envied by many. But this may soon change thanks to a radiologist and two violin makers who decided to harness computed tomography (CT) imaging and special manufacturing techniques to create a reproduction of a 1704 Stradivarius violin.  Read More
Senseg's technology would allow you to feel textures on a tablet's screen
What if you could feel what's on your television screen? Tech company Senseg is working on a way for you to someday be able to do just that, and recently demonstrated a prototype tablet that is already able to make that magic happen.  Read More
A Harvard computer scientist has created a digital 'face transplant' system, that could be...
If you've seen the film The Social Network, then you might have wondered about the identical Winklevoss twins - were a real-life pair of twins cast for the roles, or was it a bit of Hollywood magic? Well, it was magic. Although two different actors' bodies were used, their faces both belonged to actor Armie Hammer. After the movie was shot, the body double's face was digitally replaced with Armie's. While such computer-enabled face-swapping trickery has so far been available only to feature film-makers with deep pockets, that could be about to change, thanks to research being conducted at Harvard University.  Read More
The Top Brewer is a coffee-making system that dispenses brewed-to-order hot beverages from...
Wouldn't it be cool if, along with your flying car and your robot butler, you had a tap in your kitchen that dispensed hot beverages? You'd just shuffle into the kitchen in the morning, and grab a cappuccino in the same way that you'd usually get a glass of water from the tap in the sink - that said, it probably wouldn't be a good idea to put your mouth right up to the coffee tap. Anyhow, such a thing does indeed now exist, and it's called the Top Brewer.  Read More

Golden orb web spiders, such as the red-legged golden orb-web spider (pictured), could hel...
Ants. What a pest. Once you get them in your house it can be a real mission to get rid of them. But it seems the Golden orb web spider has developed a way to keep its home clear of the little buggers. The secret uncovered by researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) and the University of Melbourne relates to a chemical compound the spider adds to its web that appears to repel ants. So not only are spider webs providing inspiration for better adhesives and stronger materials, they may also provide the basis for new, environmentally friendly, ant-repelling pesticides.  Read More
Flashing arrows displayed on the road indicate the vehicle's future path
Amongst the modern furniture and “design-art” on display at this year’s Design Miami/ international design show visitors were also treated to the Bjarke Ingels Group’s (BIG) vision for the future of urban mobility. Dubbed “Urban Future,” the international architectural firm’s installation, created with the cooperation of Audi, provided a glimpse of how its concept for the city street of the future that networks with vehicles and pedestrians might actually work.  Read More
Bethesda will release the development tools used to make Skyrim along with a new platform ...
With Bethesda's latest game - The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim - still garnering a lot of buzz and racking up "Game of the Year" nominations less than a month after release, one might expect the video game developer to happily rest on its laurels for a moment. Luckily for the modding community, Bethesda is instead releasing its brand new Creation Engine for free to have the public do with as they wish. While it's not uncommon for a video game developer to give out its development tools, it is a little less common for those tools to be packed with a platform for distributing, rating, and even installing mods with a smartphone.  Read More
Bob Wiley's Ministar dispenses with the traditional guitar body, which adds little or noth...
Guitarists who travel a lot and want to take an instrument along for the ride - but don't want to risk damaging that prized vintage Strat - might find themselves turning in the direction of a scaled down stand-in. Such solutions come in many different shapes and sizes - from full size instruments with parts that collapse (like Daniel Mapp's Jetson travel guitar concept) to models with a shortened neck and small bodies (such as Martin's Backpacker) to strange-looking beasts with tuners positioned in a hollowed out section of the body (like the Traveler's Speedster). Bob Wiley's Ministar guitars, though, are essentially a bunch of necks with pickups. While there is a model with a shortened 19-inch scale neck, most of the odd-looking electric, acoustic and bass guitars sport full length necks and, says Wiley, play and sound just like the big brand models, but at a fraction of the price - and a fraction of the size.  Read More
bioWAVE is a wave power system, inspired by the swaying motions of kelp plants
Anyone who has ever been scuba diving in a bull kelp forest will tell you - the stuff does not stand still. The marine aquatic plant consists of a long skinny-but-tough stem (or stipe) that is anchored to the sea floor and topped with a hollow float, from which a number of "leaves" (or blades) extend to the surface. The result is a seaweed that extends vertically up through the water column, continuously swaying back and forth with the surging waves. The researchers at Australia's BioPower Systems evidently looked at that kelp, and thought, "what if we could use that swaying action to generate power?" The result was their envisioned bioWAVE system, which could soon become a reality, thanks to a just-announced AUD$5 million (US$5.1 million) grant from the Victorian Minister for Energy and Resources.  Read More
Memo Touch tablet comes with software that provides memory-challenged aging users with vir...
While most of the newest tech products are marketed at youngsters or people of working age, there's an increasing number of gadgets aimed at senior users as well. A case in point is the recently introduced Memo Touch tablet, which is based on a 10-inch Archos 101 tablet and comes with custom software that provides memory-challenged aging users with virtual assistance to help them deal with everyday activities and it allows caregivers to update content remotely.  Read More
A team has claimed the complete prize purse in DARPA's Shredder Challenge, two days before...
At the end of October, DARPA (the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency) launched its Shredder Challenge contest. The objective: create a system for reconstructing shredded papers, then demonstrate it by piecing together five documents, the shredded remains of which were posted on the contest’s website. Although the contest had a December 4th deadline, the “All Your Shreds Are Belong to U.S.” team correctly reassembled all five documents with two days to spare.  Read More
The SteadePod is a camera-stabilizing device, that holds the camera steady using upward te...
When most of us want to steady a camera for a long exposure or telephoto shot, we look for something that will accept the camera’s weight, such as a tripod or a handy flat horizontal surface. The pocket-sized SteadePod, however, uses what could almost be considered the opposite approach – it requires the user to pull up on the camera, the upward tension serving to stabilize their shot.  Read More
Sharp's 12-megapixel sensor has built-in image stabilization and is capable of capturing 1...
Mobile phones may have the opportunity to get even thinner. Sharp has recently taken the wraps off its new 12-megapixel smartphone camera sensor, which it claims is the thinnest camera sensor on the market. Measuring in at a mere 5.6 millimeters thick, the sensor has built-in image stabilization and is capable of capturing 1080p high-definition video. The optical image stabilization in the lens makes it ideal for situations where pictures are often blurry due to camera shake, such as low-light situations.  Read More
In yet another example of internet mass media hysteria (reporters not checking facts and racing to get the story out quickly in the unholy pursuit of the holy dollar), a pile-up of 14 cars in Japan on Sunday morning has been universally labelled as the the world's most expensive automobile accident. Among the wreckage were eight Ferraris (including two F430s, two F355s, two 360 Modenas and an F512), a Lamborghini Diablo, a Nissan GT-R and a Mercedes CL600, and while there will certainly be a few very expensive repair bills, the crash doesn't even come close to being the world's most costly.  Read More

The inflatable geodesic 'Cave' tent from Heimplanet
Camping can be fun but to be honest, tents are a pain. The romance of carrying your accommodations with you and the excitement of arriving at a new destination can both be swiftly tempered by reality. Erecting your tent using bent aluminum poles, bits of string, damp plastic sheeting and too few pegs becomes old very quickly. Add in pitch darkness and/or rain and the temptation to head for the nearest dodgy hotel can become irresistible. It doesn't have to be that way. Eight years ago two Stefan's from Germany had an idea for a better tent - and now it's here. Time to erect - 1 minute.  Read More
Mountain Hardwear's Dry.Q water-proof breathable fabric is among a new breed of sporting a...
A new dawn is breaking in the evolution of outdoor apparel technology. Many materials that dominate today's outdoor clothes - wool and down, for instance - have been plucked straight from nature for hundreds of years. While textile manufacturers and clothing companies have tried to improve upon natural designs, they've generally failed to come up with anything that unequivocally surpasses Mother Nature. Just beyond the action videos and gear shops though, an improved generation of materials with the potential to displace stale staples is slowly moving from test labs to retail shelves. If these materials can brave the real world and live up to the hype, outdoor apparel - and outdoor sports - will look very different in the future.  Read More
The CICADA is a gliding unmanned air vehicle, designed to deploy sensors in enemy territor...
When soldiers want to gather intelligence in enemy territory, they often have to travel into that territory themselves, depositing acoustic, magnetic, chemical/biological or signals intelligence sensors by hand. Not only does this place the soldiers in harm's way, but the logistics of such missions can also end up being quite costly. That's why the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory Vehicle Research Section created the CICADA unmanned air vehicle (UAV). The tiny sensor-equipped glider was successfully tested at Arizona's Yuma Proving Grounds on September 1st.  Read More
magnetU is a wearable electronic device, that wirelessly seeks out other magnetU-users who...
When I was younger and cared a lot more about being “cool,” I would sometimes wear T-shirts with the names of my favorite rock bands on them. While this was partly just to show off my supposed musical enlightenment to the world, it was also in hopes that some like-minded person (preferably female and attractive) would see it and strike up a friendship with me. Well, magnetU is sort of like a high-tech band T-shirt. The wearable radio frequency device wirelessly transmits your personality profile to the world as you roam the streets, ever on the lookout for another magnetU transmitting a compatible profile from a nearby person. Should that occur, both devices will alert their owners that a potential social match is in the vicinity.  Read More
The Dartz Jo-Mojo electric roadster
Estonian armored vehicle maker Dartz has partnered with the Gray Design studio for the second time to give its recently-launched fuel-driven Mojo two-seater roadster an electric make-over. The lightly armored open-top electric low-rider will use the same Russian monocoque armoring system used for bigger vehicles like the Combat T-98. Designed for the streets of the Cote d'Azur, the Jo-Mojo will feature a novel sliding cover that will not only lock the car between trips but will also have solar cells built in, to give the onboard batteries some juice while baking in the Mediterranean sun.  Read More
Aptera Motors announced last Friday that it has ceased operations
With its stunningly-exotic “car of the future” looks, extremely high claimed fuel efficiency, and a projected price of under US$30,000, the Aptera was a car that captured many peoples’ imaginations. Perhaps best of all, when the vehicle was initially launched, the first consumer models were slated for delivery by the next year – this appeared to be no pie-in-the-sky concept. After several years of pushing that delivery date forward, however, Aptera Motors announced last Friday that it was ceasing operations.  Read More
The Chromatic Typewriter was initially intended to be purely conceptual
A typewriter that paints? Artist Tyree Callahan modified this 1937 Underwood Standard typewriter to do just that, replacing each key with a different hue that can paint on paper. A chromatic typewriter isn't by any means practical (the keys have to be manually reloaded with paint) - but the concept is still pretty interesting. So, how did he come up with the idea to create the typewriter, and once he had that idea how did he turn it into a reality? We had the opportunity to talk about the project with Tyree.  Read More
A new range of mobile phones from ENMAC are aimed at the Islamic market
Hong Kong-based electronics company ENMAC, which describes itself as the "world leader in digital Islamic Products" has announced the latest iterations in its range of digital color Qurans. Among them are a range of mobile phones which come preinstalled with 29 translations and seven recorded recitations of the religious text. The enterprise appears to be a relatively simple but potentially shrewd combination of aging mobile technology with readily-available recordings of the Quran. It's a notable development as an instance of electronics hardware (rather than merely an app) being tailored to an enormous religious market.  Read More
The design resembles an emergency cross symbol that has fallen onto its side, as if affect...
Portugal's OODA architectural firm has conceptualized a Disaster Education Centre that also doubles as an emergency shelter in the event of a real-life disaster. The center has been designed for the city of Istanbul and would be fully equipped with adequate technology and facilities to respond to a natural emergency. The center focuses on educating the public about disasters, with a special focus on earthquakes and floods. The design of the building reflects this theme, resembling an emergency cross symbol that has fallen onto its side, as if affected by an earthquake.  Read More
Despite the illusion of democracy which the world's Governments present, the 2011 report s...
“Corruption” is defined by Transparency International (TI) as “the abuse of entrusted power for private gain.” Each year TI publishes a “Corruption Perceptions Index” which scores the world's nations out of ten for their public sector honesty and the just-released 2011 report paints a bleak picture. Only six countries scored 9.0 or better, and just 49 of the 186 countries assessed in the report scored better than 5.0. Analysis shows more than 80% of human beings on Planet Earth exist under regimes which score 4.0 or less. December 9 is World Anti-Corruption Day. Corruption hurts everyone - the following article shows what's wrong and where, and what you can do to help make the world a fairer place.  Read More

A cross-section of engineered cartilage tissue, which initially incorporated fast-degradin...
Injuries involving torn or degraded joint cartilage can be very debilitating, especially since that cartilage is incapable of healing itself, past a certain point. It's not surprising, therefore, that numerous scientists have been working on ways of either growing replacement cartilage outside of the body, or helping the body to regrow it internally. Just a few of the efforts have included things like stem cell-seeded bandages, bioactive gel, tissue scaffolds, and nanoscale stem cell-carrying balls. Now, researchers from Cleveland's Case Western Reserve University have announced something else that shows promise - sheets of mesenchymal (bone and cartilage-forming) stem cells, permeated with tiny beads filled with the growth factor beta-1.  Read More
A team of researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed a computer image sortin...
Alexei Efros and his team of cunning robotics researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed an image matching algorithm with which computers can identify similar images regardless of medium. Like humans, the system can match sketches and paintings with photographs of similar subjects, and so perform tasks that have traditionally posed problems to machines, such as pairing a simple sketch of a car with a photograph of the same.  Read More
Acer has announced a new addition to its Iconia Tab tablet series - the A200, which will i...
Acer has unveiled a new addition to its Iconia tablet series in the oddly familiar shape of the Iconia Tab A200. The budget-friendly A200 shares much of its hardware profile with the company's Iconia Tab A500 launched earlier in the year, although the former lacks a rear-facing camera and will come in 8GB and 16GB varieties only. When it first hits the shelves, the new tablet will run on Android 3.2 but Acer says that as soon as Google's next flavor of Android (codenamed Ice Cream Sandwich) is released in January 2012, the new tablet will be switched to the new operating system - with a free upgrade to Android 4.0 for existing A200 owners.  Read More
ip.access' Advanced Femtocell Concept and base station (Photo: ip.access)
Femtocell and picocell manufacturer ip.access unveiled its fully functioning 'Advanced Femtocell Concept' (AFC) at the no doubt riotous Femtocells Americas 2011 conference in San Diego on Monday. A relatively new technology, femtocells essentially provide mobile phone network access via a local broadband connection. It's a technology that might interest homes and businesses in signal-blocking buildings, remote areas, or anywhere where cellular signals are patchy. But how is the AFC different? In a word: portability.  Read More
HealthTap gives patients direct health advice from legitimate medical professionals with i...
The sad fact is that most sources of health care advice online are sorely lacking in reliability. People with potential health problems are usually stuck wading through a wide array of potential diagnoses for their symptoms which may or may not have been fact-checked by an actual doctor. HealthTap says it can change this perception with a service that verifies the credentials of physicians and incentivizes doctors to participate by enhancing their reputations.  Read More
The world's first molybdenite microchip has been successfully tested in Switzerland.
Back in February, Darren Quick wrote about the unique properties of Molybdenite and how this material, previously used mostly as a lubricant, could actually outshine silicon in the construction of transistors and other electronic circuits. In brief: it's much more energy efficient than silicon, and you can slice it into strips just three atoms thick - meaning that you can make transistors as much as three times smaller than before, and make them flexible to boot. Well, the technology has now been proven with the successful testing of the world's first molybdenite microchip in Switzerland. Does this mean Lausanne will become known as "Molybdenite Valley?"  Read More
The Swildens desks will return to their original home at at 75 avenue de la Grande Armee i...
The Swilden desk - a flourish of metal in which the desk surface winds in on itself to become the chair - was originally commissioned in 1966 for the foyer of the then new Peugeot head office in Paris. Three desks were created and three receptionists were each seated at their very own work of art. Since they were decommissioned, the three extraordinary industrial chic desks have been so sought after at auction, that French furniture designer Furdess has negotiated with the original designer, Ben Swildens, to create a limited re-release of eight desks. Only three are still to be sold, with an asking price of EUR65,000 (US$87,000) a piece.  Read More
Nextpeer adds multiplayer features to any single player game
A new service called Nextpeer has just become available for any iOS developer wishing to add multiplayer features to their single player game. Typically, when a mobile game developer wants social or multiplayer elements in its games - leaderboards, achievements, tournaments, etc. - it has to build them itself. Nextpeer eliminates this hassle by offering a free SDK that can bring these features and more into any game that uses it.  Read More
A composite image of the Whirlpool Galaxy (also known as M51) - the green image from the H...
Although it might sound like an oxymoron, the newly unveiled SCUBA-2 camera housed at the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) on Mauna Kea, Hawaii, is the world’s largest submillimeter camera. Submillimeter refers not to the physical size of the new camera itself, but to the submillimeter waveband between the far-infrared and microwave wavebands that the telescope observes. Being far more sensitive and powerful than its predecessor, SCUBA-2 will be able to map areas of the sky faster than ever before and provide information about the early life of stars, planets and galaxies.  Read More
Roboden electrical cable stretches like human skin
Researchers from Japanese company Asahi Kasei Fibers have developed what is claimed to be the world's first elastic electric cable. Inspired by the extensibility of human skin, the Roboden cable has been initially designed as a wiring solution for humanoid robots and wearable electronics. The stretchy cable could also find its way into personal electronics in the form of power cords or USB data cables.  Read More
Rinspeed's modular 'Dock Go' concept comprises a vehicular backpack that docks to the rear...
Rinspeed is renowned for producing exotic concept vehicles for the Geneva Motor Show each year - the aquatic sQuba and shape-shifting iChange being two prime examples - and the 2012 show looks like it will be no exception. We've seen external battery packs designed to increase the battery life of a smartphone, and now Rinspeed's "Dock+Go" concept brings the same idea to electric vehicles in the form of a vehicular backpack that docks to the rear of an electric vehicle to extend not only their range, but also their cargo-carrying capabilities.  Read More
The all-electric CARGO3 from Adiva
If there is one thing that electric motorcycles are ideal for, it is for ferrying deliveries around congested urban centers quickly and efficiently. And that's just the market Italian-based Adiva has in its sights with the CARGO3 scooter it displayed at the 2011 Tokyo Motor Show. Similar to the newly electrified Honda Canopy, the CARGO3 is an all-electric tilting three-wheeler (one front, two rear) that features a rear deck to accommodate an optional rear mounting box, plus a roof, deflectors and wiper-equipped wide windscreen for protection from the elements.  Read More
Google Chrome has pulled into second place in the browser war according to StatCounter
Google Chrome has pulled into second place in the browser war according to website analytics company StatCounter. Chrome now has 25.69 percent of the market while Firefox has 25.23 percent. Both browsers are trailing the Internet Explorer which still owns 40.63-percent of the market.  Read More
The Tooth Guardian would use a camera to display an image of your teeth on your bathroom m...
Going to the dentist is hardly anyone's favorite activity, but it can be hard for you to see everything that's going on with your teeth in a mirror at home while you brush. The Tooth Guardian concept is designed to help cut down on unwanted dentist visits by integrating a camera into your toothbrush. The camera takes a look at your chompers while you brush, and displays an image of what it sees on your bathroom mirror – the idea is that you would see where you're missing in your daily brush routine, or be able to catch things like cavities early.  Read More
The smart for-us is a concept car, that combines a smart fortwo with a pickup truck
Much as some people loathe it, I’ve always kind of liked the Subaru Baja. It has the quirky short-bed car/truck look of the Hummer, but isn’t anywhere near as large and nasty as that vehicle. Well, the designers at smart have taken the “little Hummer” idea to the extreme, with the for-us concept. Premiering next month at the North American International Auto Show, the two-seater electric car looks pretty much like a smart fortwo ... with a little cargo bed in back.  Read More
The ROBOCAST Project is developing a robotic system for assisting with keyhole neurosurger...
In keyhole neurosurgery, a small “burr hole” is drilled in the patient’s skull, and their brain is then accessed through that hole. The procedure is much less invasive than many other types of brain surgery, and can be used for things such as exploratory endoscopy, biopsies, blood and fluid sampling, cryogenic and electrolytic ablation (tissue removal), and deep brain stimulation. It is used to treat conditions including tumors, hydrocephalus (fluid on the brain), Parkinson's disease, Tourette syndrome, and epilepsy. For a neurosurgeon, however, it can sometimes be extremely exacting work – a slip of even a fraction of a millimeter can cause permanent brain damage. That’s why the European Union’s ROBOCAST (ROBOt and sensors integration for Computer Assisted Surgery and Therapy) Project is developing a robotic system to help out.  Read More
The iLaunch Thunder is controlled by your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch
All those missile shooting games on your iPhone not realistic enough for you? Brando's iLaunch Thunder is a missile launcher that pairs with your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch over Bluetooth, and allows you to shoot missiles at unsuspecting victims up to 25 feet away.  Read More
Lenovo has announced a new laptop specifically tailored for schools and students, the Leno...
Lenovo has announced a new laptop specifically tailored for schools and students - the Lenovo ThinkPad X130e. Featuring school-proof reinforced, yet lightweight design, the new 11.6-incher from Lenovo comes with multimedia- and web content-capable hardware and battery that should last throughout the entire school day, or even a bit longer.  Read More
Luxury e-bike manufacturer M55 has made good on its earlier promise by releasing new editi...
The folks at Budapest's prestigious M55 e-bike studio have been far from idle since we brought news of the launch of the company's Terminus e-bike a few months ago. All of the remaining limited production run editions have now been released - including the Biceps model with the strange-looking front suspension system that's claimed to enhance safety and the "tailor-made" version, where buyers can combine favored aspects of any of the other available designs. Two other models have now been added to the catalog - one featuring customer-specified artwork and the other covered in sparkly gems and gold or silver trim.  Read More
The facade of Big Tree Farm's all-bamboo chocolate factory
We've seen cutting boards, bicycles, floors, even houses made of bamboo, but an organic chocolate factory? Evidently, when Ben Ripple and Frederick Schilling, the two co-CEOs of specialty food company Big Tree Farms (BTF) talked about sustainably building their new plant, they put their money where their mouths are. Now, the Indonesian island of Bali is home to what BTF claims is the largest all-bamboo commercial building ever constructed, and soon, it'll be cranking out tasty chocolate bars by the thousands.  Read More

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