New and Emerging Technology News part 147 ~ NEW GEN TECH LIFE : new generation technology news

Sunday, 2 February 2014

New and Emerging Technology News part 147


Sound Perfume glasses - side view (Photo: Yongsoon Choi)
Researchers from Keio University in Tokyo created glasses designed to augment the wearer's experience by providing additional audio and olfactory stimuli during social encounters. Fitted with speakers and scent emitters, the spectacles emit sound and smell signals unique to the person you meet. This eyewear is clearly more than just a fashion accessory. Rather, in the words of its makers, it is an attempt to encourage face-to-face communication with emotional and memorable sound and smell experiences.  Read More
 

 Plane-mounted camera detects hazardous volcanic ash in the air

December 13, 2011
The AVOID System designed to allow aircraft to detect volcanic ash plumes and avoid them (...
A new invention out of Norway promises to keep the skies of the world open. When a volcano in Iceland erupted in 2010, it spewed out invisible clouds of ash that spread across Europe–effectively shutting down all civilian and military air traffic, stranding millions of people and costing the world economy billions of dollars. Now, a new camera has been developed that will allow pilots to see and avoid volcanic dust clouds, making similar eruptions in the future much less disruptive.  Read More
Lumus transparent lenses display a virtual 87-inch screen, while allowing you to see what'...
Cinema glasses aren't exactly anything new. You typically wear the glasses like you would your favorite pair of shades, and then see what appears to be a private giant screen in front of you. The downside of these cinema-shades? You can't see what's actually going on in the world around you. Lumus is attempting to fix that issue with a new line of video glasses that you can see through. The transparent lenses display what appears to your eyes as an 87-inch screen, while allowing you to see what's going on in front of you at the same time.  Read More
The Varley evR-540 electric supercar will arrive in January 2012
Australia has a new home-grown electric supercar. The recently announced Varley evR-540 is handbuilt around an aluminum monocoque chassis and powered by locally developed and engineered twin Carbon ironless core AC motors with Tritium Wavesculptor inverters claimed to be up to 95% efficient. The performance of this lightweight 2-seat mid-engine coupe is impressive - it's capable of accelerating from from zero to 100 km/h (62 mph) in 3.8 seconds and can reach a top speed of 180 km/h (112 mph), which puts it in the same league as the Tesla Roadster).  Read More
Media Lab postdoctoral associate Andreas Velten explains how the camera works
We've been hearing about trillions in the news so much lately, it's easy to become desensitized to just what a colossal number that is. Recently, a team of brilliant researchers at MIT's Media Lab (ML) built an imaging system capable of making an exposure every picosecond- one trillionth of a second. Just how fast is that? Why, a thousand times faster than a nanosecond, of course. Put another way, one picosecond is to one second as one second is to about 31,700 years. That's fast. So fast, in fact, this system can literally slow down light itself and it does so in a manner unlike any other camera.  Read More
Clikka Mouse is software designed for those who have trouble clicking a mouse
Not everyone can easily click a mouse. Many people with permanent motor disability have difficulties, along with those suffering Repetitive Stress Disorder or Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, and anyone recovering from hand surgery. Clikka Mouse is innovative "work around" software that addresses the problem and best of all, it's free.  Read More
Things could get tougher for bacteria such as these E. coli, thanks to two new bacteria-ki...
According to Dr. Dick Zoutman of Queen's University in Canada, over 100,000 people die every year in North America alone, due to hospital-acquired infections. It would only seem to follow that hospitals need to be kept cleaner, and Zoutman has developed something that he says can do the job - an ozone and hydrogen peroxide vapor gas. Some bacteria are particularly tenacious, however, and that's where Dr. Udi Qimron of Tel Aviv University comes into the picture. He has developed a liquid solution in which viruses are used to make antibiotic-resistant bacteria once again vulnerable to traditional cleansers.  Read More


Before and after: a close-up of Snapheal's goose erasure (Photo: Gizmag)
Snapheal, to be released on Wednesday, is a photo editing app for Mac which "can do magic", at least according to MacPhun, the app's developer. In addition to the usual tweaks and minor edits allowed by vanilla entry-level photo editing software, Snapheal allows you to erase whole objects - including large ones - from your photographs. Gizmag took an advance copy of Snapheal 1.0 for a spin. Could it be magic? Judge for yourself.  Read More
Stratolaunch Systems has announced its planned air-launch-to-orbit system, which will get ...
Seven years ago, philanthropist Paul G. Allen collaborated with aerospace expert Burt Rutan, to create SpaceShipOne – the first privately-funded, manned rocket ship to fly beyond Earth’s atmosphere, and winner of the Ansari X PRIZE. Now, in the post-Shuttle era, the two men have reunited to create a reusable vehicle for launching both manned and unmanned rockets into space. The project was announced in Seattle today.  Read More
The Mountainskyver TRAIL is a folding downhill scooter that can be packed to the top of a ...
Zipping down the side of a mountain on a downhill mountain bike can be incredibly fun, but getting the bike up there ... well, you can pedal the 40 to 50-pound thing to the top yourself, pay to use a zero-exercise chair lift, or add to your bike's weight with an electric-assist motor. In an approach we've seen before in the form of the Mountain Monk, German gear company ORTOVOX is offering another way to get to the summit and back down again. It's called the Mountainskyver TRAIL, and it's a folding downhill scooter(?) that a hiker carries to the mountaintop in an included custom backpack, then quickly assembles and rides back down.  Read More

Aquabotix has rolled out a new underwater viewing system in the form of the iOS- and Andro...
Smartphones can already be used to remotely control a variety of vehicles, including flying toy helicopters and airplanes, or even starting your car. Now remotely operated underwater vehicles (ROVs) can be added to the list with New England-based company Aquabotix rolling out its Hydroview vehicle. Equipped with LED lights and a HD video camera, the vehicle transmits a live video feed to an iOS- or Android-based smartphone, tablet, or a laptop and can be remotely operated by tilting the phone or tablet or via the laptop's touchpad.  Read More
The SensoGlove, which monitors a golfer's grip on their club, has been upgraded
Working with a golf pro can definitely help to improve your performance on the greens, although pros can sometimes find it difficult to determine if you’re gripping your club too tightly, just by watching. Germany’s Sensosolutions addressed that problem with its SensoGlove, a computer- and sensor-equipped glove that allows users to set their desired level of grip, and then receive feedback on whether or not they’re gripping within that range. Yesterday, the company announced that the glove has now been improved.  Read More
Pictures and video can be instantly shared from within the app on Facebook, Twitter, Flick...
The iPhone has a ton of built-in features, but one feature it doesn't have is a 3D camera - until now. Snapily3D is an iPhone app that allows you to capture 3D pictures and video with the camera on your iPhone. The app is compatible with the iPhone 3GS, iPhone 4, iPhone 4S, and iPod touch 3rd generation and above, and walks you through the 3D picture-taking process through on-screen directions and prompts.  Read More
The Lumia 710 will be the first Nokia Windows Phone to make it to U.S. soil, and also  the...
Nokia is officially bringing its Windows Phones to the U.S., announcing today plans to release the Lumia 710 on T-Mobile on January 11th. The announcement of the phone marks the first Nokia Windows Phone to make it to U.S. soil, and also the first Windows phone in general to be billed as a 4G device, running on T-Mobile's HSPA 14.4 network.  Read More
The Rotauf MK5 gives you one more tool for avalanche survival
Beacons and probes are slow and tedious. Avalanche airbags are large and expensive. The Rotauf MRK5, however, offers some serious avalanche protection advantages in a small package.  Read More
The All Sports GPS is the first GPS unit to use Android and WiFi
The world's first handheld GPS to use the Android mobile operating system is gearing up for release. The All Sports GPS from Holux is also the first handheld unit with WiFi capability. The idea is to fuse smartphone capability into a handheld GPS, allowing users to download GPS apps directly without having to hookup to a computer.  Read More
The FourPro is a salt-tolerant underwater housing for the iPhone 4 and 4S, which allows th...
If nothing else, the iPhone 4’s ability to shoot 1080p high-def video has certainly done one thing – provided inventors with things to make. There is currently what could almost be described as a gold rush, as products are being designed to augment the smartphone’s camera, to the point that it could be used for all of the same things as traditional, stand-alone video cameras. Some of these innovations have included interchangeable lenses, a mini SteadiCam, and a rugged helmet-mount system. Now, an underwater housing system for the iPhone 4 and 4S is in the works, which will allow users to shoot undersea video at depths of up to 100 feet (30.5 meters).  Read More
Italian high fashion meets veteran bicycle engineering in the very expensive Bianchi by Gu...
When a cycling helmet is priced at nearly US$900, a pair of cycling gloves at over US$300 and a water bottle at US$105, it's a sure thing that the bike that goes with them is going to be really, really expensive. Such is the case with the new Bianchi by Gucci carbon fiber two-wheeler, which sees two Italian veterans come together for the release of this US$14,000 bike. Read on for a rundown of the key specs.  Read More
Results of a proton-proton collision with four identified muons, a possible signature of a...
The results of two recent experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) near Geneva suggest physicists are close to discovering the Higgs boson, the so-called God particle. Combined, the two experiments have narrowed the possible band of possible Higgs boson masses. Though not sufficient to claim a discovery, the latest experiments restrict the region in which the Higgs boson might be hiding.  Read More
Advaero Helicopter Shafts - the carbon composite is lighter, stronger, more durable, does ...
When the Wright Brothers first took to the skies more than hundred years ago they did so with an aircraft made with a fabric skin. Over the years a variety of materials have been used including sheet metals such as aluminum and titanium, and even ceramics. A fabric of sorts has now returned in the form of carbon fiber, a composite material that offers greater strength-to-weight ratio than virtually anything else. While airplane manufacturers have used carbon fiber in airplanes for some time, its use is on the rise due to the material's durability and rigidity ... and with the advent of new manufacturing processes such as Advaero's Heat Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Method (HVARTM), this looks set to continue.  Read More
 
A rendering of the harpoon embedded in a comet, with its collection cartridge visible insi...
Call it Ishmael. Actually, no, call it the Comet Nucleus Sample Return mission spacecraft. Regardless of its name, the NASA vehicle will be wielding a harpoon, not unlike the narrator of Moby Dick. Instead of hunting a white whale, however, it will be after a comet. Although the spacecraft itself is still a concept, its harpoon is in the works now.  Read More
Scientists are looking into using a computerized penetrometer to assess the crispness of a...
Here’s a job title that you probably didn’t know existed: Apple Biter. Oh sure, the official term is probably something like “Fruit Evaluation Specialist,” but if you spend your days chomping into apples to assess their taste and crispness, you’re really an Apple Biter. While using panels of such people is a common method of evaluating the quality of apple crops, it can be compromised when those people start to get fatigued. There’s also the not-insignificant fact that panel members could differ in what they consider to be the optimal level of crispness. That’s why Washington State University is looking into using a computerized penetrometer to handle part of the Apple Biters’ duties.  Read More
Prada and LG 3.0 have released a new Android phone
Fashionistas can have their phone and use it too. The third phone to come out of the partnership between PRADA and LG 3.0 was unveiled this week in London. The slim and stylish handset runs Android's Gingerbread OS. A distinct PRADA influence is evident on the phone's design. The handset exhibits clean and sharp lines with the design house's signature Saffiano pattern, typically etched into its leather goods, adorning the back of the phone.  Read More
 Principle of the microscopic engine (Diagram: University of Stuttgart)
It sounds implausible, yet scientists have managed to create a functioning engine, analogous to a Stirling engine, just three micrometers wide and made of a single particle. The minuscule engine was created by Clemens Bechinger and Valentin Blickle at the University of Stuttgart, and though it has its quirks, the pair have apparently demonstrated the engine's ability to do work.  Read More
A North Sails 3Di in action
Sail technology has come a long way since the days tall ships were carried along by billowing clouds of canvas. In fact, new aerodynamic discoveries coupled with exotic materials have turned modern sails into veritable works of high tech art. Today, sailmakers know that the less a sail distorts (through stretching, shear, compression or shrinkage) the more force or drive remains available to power the boat - especially helpful when you're in a close race for that final buoy. Now, the innovative designers at North Sails have woven an interesting array of tricks into their unique new 3Di line of "canvas" - laminated, heat-molded sails that hold their shape so well, they come close to performing like rigid airfoils.  Read More
The Samsung Galaxy Nexus will be the first Google Phone pre-loaded with Android 4.0 Ice Cr...
The first Android 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich smartphone will soon be available in its country of origin on Wednesday. OK, technically the Samsung Galaxy Nexus is made in Asia, but the latest Google phone carrying the anticipated Android upgrade traces its software roots to California. Fans there and in the rest of the United States have eagerly been awaiting its arrival while watching the device's global rollout pass them by.  Read More
Researchers have used functional magnetic resonance imaging technology to help test subjec...
How would you like to have the ability to play the piano downloaded into your brain? You might not end up with the same sense of achievement, but it sure would be a lot quicker and easier than years of lessons and practicing. Well, we're not there yet (and perhaps we never should be), but that sort of scenario is now a little closer to reality, thanks to research conducted at Boston University and ATR Computational Neuroscience Laboratories in Kyoto, Japan.  Read More
Innergie Magic Cable Trio integrates three tips in a single power and sync cord, including...
The myriad of mobile devices in constant need of recharging that many people now have in their possession can quickly lead to chronic cable clutter, especially when hitting the road. Innergie's Magic Cable Trio provides a neat solution by integrating connectors for micro USB, mini USB and Apple’s 30-pin dock connector in a single convenient cable.  Read More
Arthropod cuticle, found in insects, spiders and crustaceans, has provided inspiration for...
Web-slinging arachnids already have researchers toiling away looking to replicate the remarkable properties of spider silk. Now spiders, along with their insect and crustacean arthropod cousins, have provided inspiration for a new material that is cheap to produce, biodegradable, and biocompatible. Its creators say the material, dubbed "Shrilk," has the potential to replace plastics in consumer products and could also be used safely in a variety of medical applications, such as suturing wounds or serving as scaffolding for tissue regeneration.  Read More
Louis Garneau Carbon Pro Team shoe in red
Chew on a stick of gum sweetened with xylitol and you may just experience a cool sensation. Slip on a pair of Carbon Pro Team shoes from Louis Garneau and you may just get the same feeling. While it's most common use is as a natural sweetener, properties of xylitol make it useful for clothing as well. Xylitol is woven into fabric under the brand name Ice-Fil, which is used in the insoles of the Louis Garneau Carbon Pro Team cycling shoes to help keep athletes cool.  Read More

The Louvre in France is replacing its usual audio guides with the Nintendo 3DS
Let's face it, the audio tours in museums could use a technology upgrade. While listening to the facts and stories behind each exhibit read by a D-list celebrity is still a mainstay of any noteworthy museum or art gallery, the average cell phone today has more features than most of the audio devices visitors are given to carry around. It makes sense then that the Louvre in France, the world's most visited museum, is replacing its usual audio guides with a decidedly 21st-century gadget: the Nintendo 3DS.  Read More
Cowon C2 MP3 player hands-on review
Ever since Sony introduced me to portable music with its iconic Walkman series, my enormous collection of tunes has never been far from reach. I've been through tape cassette players, mini-Disc and CD players, and MP3/OGG/FLAC digital players but have stopped short of carrying my music around on my smartphone - preferring uninterrupted listening rather than risk being bothered by incoming calls and messages. My current digital music player has been giving me serious battery life issues of late, though, which shouldn't be an issue with Cowon's C2 MP3 player with its whopping 55 hours of claimed audio playback. So is there still room for the dedicated digital music player in a world dominated by media-playing mobile phones? I've been spending some quality time with the C2 and I think there is. Here's why...  Read More
Image3D allows customers to create custom View-Master-like photo reels, using their own ph...
Along with GI Joes, Slinkies and Sea Monkeys, View-Masters are probably one of the most-remembered childhood products of the past few generations. Even if you yourself never got the chance to flip through disks of still images using one of the manually-operated stereoscopic viewers, chances are you at least knew someone who did. Well, now that you're all grown-up, you have the chance not only to relive your childhood by buying a View-Master-like Image3D viewer, but also to create a reel of your own photos to view in it. As a ten year-old, you would have thought that was pretty amazing.  Read More
Tapping one of the keys on the watch's keypad will cause the lights on the numbered keys t...
At first glance, it might be hard for you to tell how the Click Keypad watch is a watch at all. Its face features a keypad like you might find on your computer, with no display to show you the time, date, or any other information like a traditional watch might. How the watch does display those things is where the magic comes in. Tapping one of the numbered keys on the watch's keypad will cause the lights on the numbered keys to light up and show the time. For instance, if the time was 9:30, the light on the 9 would light up, followed by the 3, and then the zero.  Read More
The Alpha Clock Five in 12-hour mode
When is a clock not a clock? When it's a big fat reprogrammable five-character 18-segment display, a bit like the Alpha Clock Five from Evil Mad Science. Its 2.3 inch 18-segment alphanumeric characters are each illuminated by 54 LEDs, providing a bold, bright answer to that most burning of questions: what's the time?  Read More
The Top 10 things you CAN have for Christmas 2011
Having taken a look at some highly desirable items that are highly unlikely to find their way under the tree this year with our 2011 list of things you CAN'T have this Christmas, it's time for a look at some of the gear that might represent more realistic shopping options this festive season. There's definitely some items on the list we wouldn't mind receiving ourselves, while others fall into the category of "for the person who has everything" ... either way, there's sure to be something for every technophile in the household.  Read More
The even distribution of different cell types seen in the intestinal tissues of young frui...
Caloric restriction has been shown to slow the signs of aging and delay the development of age-related diseases in a wide range of animals. However, scientists have been unable to explain just why limiting daily food intake has such a beneficial effect on health and the biological mechanisms that underlie the phenomenon. Researchers in Sweden recently claimed to have unlocked a piece of the puzzle by identifying one of the enzymes that appears to play a major role in the process and now another group in the U.S. has provided another clue by tweaking a gene in fruit flies and extending their lifespan by as much as 50 percent.  Read More
The four-cup SlickBoil retails for US$35
Everywhere you look, items made with or from silicone rubber continue to pop up like mushrooms after a long spring rain. From artificial lungs to cookie sheets, even baby bottles, this versatile, non-toxic material is becoming increasingly indispensable in our everyday lives. Now tea kettles can be added to the list of items getting the silicone treatment with the four-cup SlickBoil from Cuissential that takes advantage of silicone's flexibility to shrink to a space-saving package when not preparing a refreshing brew.  Read More
Researchers have developed a coating for fabric, that could be used to clean clothing simp...
For some time now, we’ve been hearing about the benefits of drying our laundry outside on the clothesline. We save money and energy by not running the dryer, the sunlight kills germs, and we don’t run the risk of generating harmful dryer emissions. In the future, however, we might also end up washing our clothes by hanging them outside – scientists in China have successfully used sunlight to remove orange dye stains from cotton fabric, that was treated with a special coating.  Read More
An international team of researchers has set a world record two-way data rate over long di...
An international team is claiming a data transfer record that puts any home broadband connection to shame. At last month’s SuperComputing 2011 (SC11) conference in Seattle, researchers reached transfer rates of 98 gigabits per second (Gbps) between the University of Victoria Computing Centre located in Victoria, British Columbia, and the Washington State Convention Center in Seattle. Coupled with a simultaneous data rate of 88 Gbps in the opposite direction the team reached a two-way data rate of 186 Gbps to break their own previous peak-rate record of 119 Gbps set in 2009.  Read More

Pumped-up muscle tissue (in blue) in a high performing 'mighty mouse'
He can't fly just yet, but a team of scientists have made a big step towards creating a real-life Mighty Mouse. Researchers at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, along with two Swiss institutions, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL) and the University of Lausanne, created a batch of super-strong mice and worms by tweaking a gene that normally inhibits muscle growth.  Read More
iStencyl is a program which allows you to create your web and iOS games - like Dungeon Rus...
Who says you need to now how to write code in order to create and sell your own iOS game? iStencyl is a program designed to allow you to create your web and iOS games without having any coding experience. The system lets you develop entire games using its block builder rather than code, however, it does support Objective-C for those who are code-savvy.  Read More
Police in the UK are currently testing an anti-riot laser that temporarily blinds targets
After riots this past summer left parts of the UK in shambles, it's no wonder that police in that part of the world are looking for new methods of crowd control. Since the usual methods for subduing rioters were seen as largely ineffective against their sheer numbers at the time, police have been looking into new tactics as well as non-lethal weapons to replace the standard tasers and tear gas. To that end, the next time someone tries to loot a store in England, they may find themselves literally struck blind thanks to a new riot laser currently being tested called the "SMU 100."  Read More
The Party Vest comes retrofitted with an 8-inch Boss audio bass 900 subwoofer, with a pair...
If you want to make yourself the life of the party then the Party Vest could be for you. Sure, you might struggle to carry on a conversation with anyone but it will likely be a conversation starter for other attendees at the shindig. Built on top of a Daniese Gilet Cali Tessuto motorcycle vest, the Party Vest comes retrofitted with an 8-inch Boss audio bass 900 subwoofer on the back and a pair of motorcycle speakers reaching over each shoulder.  Read More
Scania trucks will soon offer Active Prediction
As useful as GPS is in the modern world, we're really only at the tip of the iceberg when it comes to some of the potential functionality of satellite-based navigation. The Active Prediction system under development at Scania, a member of Volkswagen AG, is one example. The system fuses GPS and cruise control, allowing the vehicle to predict terrain features of the road ahead and help to boost gas mileage.  Read More
Brainlink is a module that can be added to existing household robots, allowing for the add...
While “toy” robots such as WowWee’s Robosapien already have some pretty impressive capabilities, they can now do even more ... if they have a Brainlink module installed. Brainlink is made by BirdBrain Technologies, which is a Carnegie Mellon University spin-off company. When attached to an existing infrared remote-controlled household robot, it will add a built-in light sensor and accelerometer to that device’s quiver, along with the possibility of various other user-supplied sensors that can be plugged into its input ports. The Bluetooth-equipped Brainlink also allows robots to be controlled via the user’s laptop or Android smartphone, which opens up all sorts of possibilities.  Read More
The Quad Lock iPhone case can be mounted anywhere, including the outside of a plane
The iPhone has a fantastic GPS system, can pump out your favorite tunes, and can call a friends when you're late meeting him or her for lunch. All that functionality is great, but can be hard to use when you're doing something like say, riding a bike. The QuadLock iPhone case is an iPhone case that can be used to lock your phone into place on your bicycle, car dash, or pretty much anywhere else you can think of. The case itself is made from tough polycarbonate plastic, and can be mounted in both portrait and landscape mode depending on your personal needs.  Read More
The Tak Wak tw700 GPS-smartphone-radio-buddy tracking system
Many modern outdoors folk are conflicted beings that live by diametrically opposed principles. On the one hand, they spend top dollar for the newest, lightest gear on the market to keep their muscles and joints moving freely. On the other, they fill up their featherlight packs and jackets with all kinds of single-function, redundant or just plain unnecessary devices in the name of being "prepared." Getting more function out of a single device is the quickest way to resolve this problem and the tw700 from German company Tak Wak achieves this by blending several of your most important outdoor devices - GPS, walkie talkie, camera and tracking system - into one rugged, waterproof, trail-ready package.  Read More
Postdoctoral fellow Guoming Sun (left) and Sharon Gerecht, an assistant professor of chemi...
Third-degree burns typically require very complex treatment, and leave nasty scars once they've healed. Researchers at Johns Hopkins University, however, are reporting success at treating such burns on lab mice, using a new type of hydrogel that grows new skin (as opposed to scar tissue) over burn sites. The gel contains no drugs or biological components - it's made mainly from water and dissolved dextran, which is a sugar-like polymer.  Read More

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