New and Emerging Technology News part 75 ~ NEW GEN TECH LIFE : new generation technology news

Sunday, 26 January 2014

New and Emerging Technology News part 75

Pentax has announced the forthcoming release of a new digital SLR which boasts a 12.4 MP C...
Pentax went color crazy when it released the K-x digital SLR. The company now offers 12 different colors ranging from olive green to pink to orange. Things seems to have calmed down a little for its latest release, with the K-r only coming in three colors. The new addition features a 12.4 megapixel sensor, huge sensitivity range and six frames per second continuous shooting. It's also capable of capturing 720p high definition video and benefits from a dual power design.  Read More
The EPFL/Lemoptix projector could be incorporated into smartphones
The development of a tiny new video projector has recently been announced by Switzerland’s Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL) via its spin-off company, Lemoptix. The projector is said to be smaller in area than a credit card, with a projection head measuring one cubic centimeter. Developers of the device foresee it becoming commercially available in smartphones, laptops and digital cameras, with industrial applications including possible use in operating rooms.  Read More
Sanyo has unveiled a Japanese launch for a new eneloop waist warmer, an updated neck warme...
With the cold winter months approaching fast, Sanyo has announced the release of a new eneloop universe waist warmer in Japan. Taking the form of an adjustable belt, the warmth to belly and waist is provided by a thin film heater unit powered by a mobile booster. The company has also given its neck warmer an update to make it easier to use and added a new twin set of eneloop kairo hand warmers.  Read More
Optician and optometrist Jaume Paune is the creator of contact lenses capable of correctin...
If you suffer from hyperopia, more commonly known as farsightedness or longsightedness, you may be interested to know that the world's first contact lens to correct the condition has been developed. The correction, however, is temporary – a custom-made lens is worn overnight to reshape the cornea, and when the patient wakes up and removes the lens they have perfect vision for the day.  Read More
A research project at Glasgow Caledonian University is currently taking a close look at wh...
Whether you're chilling out to some smooth jazz, venting a spleen with the help of hard rock or jumping for joy to the latest in bubblegum pop – there always seems to be a song or an album that suits whatever mood you happen to be in. A research project at Glasgow Caledonian University is currently taking a close look at why a certain piece of music evokes a particular emotive response. It is hoped that the research may lead to music being used to bring folks out of a depression or even help with pain management.  Read More
FLYsmart App for airport travelers
Spending time at an airport waiting for connecting flights or just trying to negotiate your way to your hotel can be frustrating, especially if you're on a tight schedule or budget. Like lots of problems we encounter these days ... there's an app for that. This one – FLYsmart – maps and displays all the immediate information air travelers may need, so backpackers can easily navigate their way to the cheapest form of transport leaving the airport or the business traveler can make layovers as hassle-free as possible.  Read More
The E-Quickie draws energy from electric conducting paths on the ground
Over the last couple of years there have been a number of wireless chargers hitting the market, such as the Powermat and the WildCharge. These are designed to keep mobile devices charged and ready without dealing with the hassle of cords and connections. The technology has also been proposed as a way to recharge vehicles while they are parked without having to plug them in, while some companies are looking at charging cars while they are moving from electrical conductors embedded in the road. Now, a group of students in Germany has taken that idea and run with it by building an electric vehicle called the E-Quickie that runs on wireless power transmission.  Read More
Apple's Case Program ends in its current form on September 30
This July, following the torrent of bad press surrounding the iPhone 4’s antenna issues, Apple implemented its Case Program, which provided a free Apple Bumper, (including a refund if one had already been purchased), or a choice of case from a number of third-party suppliers. The company also applied a no restocking fee return policy for dissatisfied customers. Apple has now announced that after September 30, it will continue to offer only the Bumper case for free through AppleCare and the no restocking fee policy will end.  Read More
An artist's impression of an artificial hand covered with the e-skin
Using a process described as “a lint roller in reverse,” engineers from the University of California, Berkeley, have created a pressure-sensitive electronic artificial skin from semiconductor nanowires. This “e-skin,” as it’s called, could one day be used to allow robots to perform tasks that require both grip and a delicate touch, or to provide a sense of touch in patients’ prosthetic limbs.  Read More
Postdoctoral associate Jae-Hee Han, left, graduate student Geraldine Paulus and associate ...
The size and efficiency of current photovoltaic (PV) cells means most people would probably have to cover large areas of their rooftops with such cells to even come close to meeting all their electricity needs. Using carbon nanotubes, MIT chemical engineers have now found a way to concentrate solar energy 100 times more than a regular PV cell. Such nanotubes could form antennas that capture and focus light energy, potentially allowing much smaller and more powerful solar arrays.  Read More

The Gesture Remote offers users spatial gesture access and control of content on a TV
How many device remotes do you have? One for the TV, one for the DVD/Blu-ray player, one for cable/satellite box, one for the hi-fi and perhaps even one for the computer – have I missed any? Maybe you've tried to consolidate all of these various remotes into one big universal control with lots and lots of buttons. The Gesture Remote offers something a bit different. The simple interface is completely free of buttons and spatial thumb gestures are used to access menus and choose content.  Read More
The Samsung NX100 mirrorless camera boasts the world's first i-Function Lens
Following on from the release of its first mirrorless camera, the NX10, earlier this year, Samsung has announced the launch of the NX100. Like the NX10, the mirrorless NX100 features a 14.6-megapixel APS-C size sensor and a 3-inch VGA AMOLED screen. Setting it apart, however, is the world’s first i-Function Lens, which communicates with the camera body and allows users to control camera settings using the lens.  Read More
Native Union MM04 Bluetooth Stereo Handset
Native Union's first product, which was basically a classic 1950s Bakelite telephone handset with a cord that plugged into a mobile phone, was an expensive piece of fairy floss, a visual joke which soon stopped being funny. The company's premise for selling it as an anti-radiation device was as thin as the phone's value proposition and when I found that was all the company produced, I feared for its future. It's taken them four models to create something genuinely useful, beautiful and clever, but the new Moshi Moshi 04 is worthy piece of kit indeed, even at its premium price of GBP150!  Read More
Airman 1st Class Patrick Connolly of Dayton, Ohio, demonstrates the placement of the water...
According to the Pentagon, improvised explosive devices, or IEDs, are the number one killer and threat to troops in Afghanistan. Now a new tool that shoots a blade of water capable of penetrating steel is headed to U.S. troops in Afghanistan to help them disable these deadly devices. Developed by Sandia National Laboratories researchers, the fluid blade disablement tool produces a high-speed, precise water blade to perform some precision type destruction on whatever IED it’s up against.  Read More
Philips demonstrates world's first 230V AC-powered white-light OLED module (Image: Philips...
As well as the super-thin, next-generation TV’s we’re all looking forward to, organic light emitting diodes, or OLEDs, also hold great potential as a light source. They are extremely energy efficient, dimmable, can produce many different colors, emit light over an extended area and the light they produce is diffuse and non-glaring. The thin, flat nature of OLEDs also makes it possible to create light sources in a wide variety of shapes and sizes. However, until now, the physical characteristics of OLEDs have meant they have had to be powered from low-voltage direct current (DC) sources. Philips Research has now developed the first ever OLED module that can be powered directly from a mains electricity supply.  Read More
A DNA strand passing through a nanopore in a graphene sheet
Graphene is pretty amazing stuff. Just a couple of months ago, we heard about how the one-atom thick sheets of bonded carbon atoms had been used to create the strongest pseudo-electric magnetic fields ever sustained in a lab – and that was just the latest use that had been discovered for it. Now, word comes from Harvard University and MIT that graphene could be used to rapidly sequence DNA.  Read More
An illustration of a telomerase molecule (Image: Sierra Sciences, LLC)
For many scientists who know about such things, the question isn’t whether the first person to live forever has been born, but how old they are. The basis for this belief is that, if a person can survive the next 20 or 30 years, then breakthroughs in biotechnology will easily allow them to extend their lifespan – not to mention their quality of life – to 125 years. From that point, the advances will keep coming to allow the prolonging of life indefinitely. One of the first steps towards such a reality has just been announced by a group of researchers who have discovered the first compound that activates an enzyme called telomerase in the human body.  Read More
Fraunhofer is working on technologies to address the world water shortage
The Fraunhofer research organization is concerned about the world’s fresh water supply. According to the statistics put forth by groups like the World Commission on Water for the 21st Century, that concern is justified – over 450 million people worldwide currently face severe water shortages, and as much as two thirds of the world’s population could be “water-stressed” by 2025. Likewise, a study by the UN has predicted that water is due to become more strategically important than petroleum; in other words, wars could be fought over it. In reaction to scenarios such as these, 14 of Franhofer’s research divisions have joined together to form the Fraunhofer Alliance SysWasser, with the aim of developing sustainable water system technologies. The group will be presenting six of these technologies at this week’s IFAT/Entsorga water trade fair in Munich. Here’s a quick look at each one.  Read More
ROAMpay credit card swiper for iPhones, Blackberrys, and Droids
The ability to turn a smartphone into a portable credit card swiper makes sense for small business owners on the go, as well as anyone who happens to be out of cash. Like Square, the new ROAMpay device plugs in to the audio jack of your smartphone. Using the company's app, you get the same functions as using a traditional credit terminal and it's available on iPhone and Android.  Read More
 
The 15 finalists in this year's James Dyson Award competition have now been announced
The wait is almost over. From close to 500 entries representing 18 countries, the judges in this year's James Dyson Award competition are now pawing over the final 15 projects. Amongst the finalists are reader favorites as well as projects not yet featured in Gizmag. So, let's take one last look at all of the designs that have impressed the panel of experts, ahead of the winner being announced in early October.  Read More
Serac Series
As any cola-swilling child of the 90’s will tell you, things are better when they’re clear. Water? Definitely better clear. Conscience? Ditto. Speakers? Sure, why not? We’ve already had Harman Kadon’s GLA-55 speakers featuring faceted cut-glass enclosures to expose the audio engine, but the glass speakers from Greensound Technology are even more striking. Looking like little more than a shaped pane of glass sitting atop a base, the speakers use the glass to project the sound and deliver “true 360 degree sound.”  Read More
Sharp Steamwave AX-1100 3-in-1 steam oven
Sharp has announced the new Steamwave AX-1100, a 3-in-1 steam oven with a combination of steamer, grill and microwave. The Steamwave follows the success of Sharp’s Superheated Steam Oven and is one of the first multiple ovens to introduce steam and grill to a microwave unit. Given that many households these days are centered around becoming more health conscious, the idea of having easy access to a steamer and grill will most likely prove popular.  Read More
MSI's Wind Top AE2420 3D all-in-one PC
In April, NEC announced plans to release a 3D all-in-one (AIO) desktop PC sometime this year. They were probably hoping to lay claim to being the first company to bring such a product to the market but they’ve been beaten to the punch by MSI, who is set to release its Wind Top AE2420 3D AIO PC that also boasts a touchscreen and is also the first AIO PC to feature USB 3.0 ports. Sporting a 24-inch Full HD (1080p) multi-touch display comprising a 120Hz LED panel, the AE2420 3D comes with one pair of rechargeable wireless active shutter glasses and 2D to 3D conversion capabilities.  Read More
Steven Roberts' Microship micro-trimaran
Are you “mediagenic, geeky, youthful, and insanely adventurous”? Those are the qualities that Steven Roberts is seeking in the new owner of his custom pedal/wind/solar-powered micro-trimaran, the Microship. A self-described “technomad,” Roberts is a huge fan of high technology and self-propelled solo adventuring, and the quirky little boat is clearly the lovechild of those two passions. It has a host of high-tech features, yet is intended for escaping the rat race and living simply. Ironic? Maybe, but it comes with a great story.  Read More
An engineered honeycomb of cultured theca cells (top row) envelopes spheres of granulosa c...
We recently looked at a prototype implantable artificial kidney and now, in a move that could yield infertility treatments for cancer patients and provide a powerful new means for conducting fertility research, researchers have built an artificial human ovary that can grow oocytes into mature human eggs in the laboratory. The ovary not only provides a living laboratory for investigating fundamental questions about how healthy ovaries work, but also can act as a testbed for seeing how problems, such as exposure to toxins or other chemicals, can disrupt egg maturation and health. It could also allow immature eggs, salvaged and frozen from women facing cancer treatment, to be matured outside the patient in the artificial ovary.  Read More
Researchers at Fujitsu have made huge steps toward developing effective magnetic resonance...
We're all aware of how annoying a tangled mass of electrical wires can be. Fortunately, a research effort from Fujitsu is tackling the problem at its very source. During a conference held in the Institute of Electronics, Information and Communication Engineers at Osaka Prefecture University, the Japanese electronics giant announced a major step in developing a wireless recharging technology that can work simultaneously with multiple portable devices.  Read More
TouchDevice brings touchscreen capabilities to older mobile phones
Too embarrassed to pull out your ancient, non-touchscreen mobile phone in front of your smartphone-toting friends? Sick of the sniggers and jeers as you search through your contacts using – gasp – buttons!? Desperately want to join the “in” touchscreen crowd but are still stuck in a contract that’s you can’t afford to break? Relax. New software, called TouchDevice, can give touchscreen capabilities to an ordinary mobile phone by using the phone’s microphone. In fact, it can even extend the touch surface beyond the screen to include the entire phone’s casing.  Read More
Stanford University's touch-sensitive artificial skin can detect the weight of a butterfly
It’s truly touching news... no sooner do we hear about the pressure-sensitive artificial skin created at UC Berkeley, than fellow Californians at Stanford University announce that they have also created such a material. While Berkeley’s skin relies on carbon nanotubes to detect pressure, however, Stanford’s skin utilizes a thin rubber sheet made up of tiny pyramids. It is reportedly so sensitive that it can “feel” the weight of a butterfly.  Read More
Celebrity Cruises is putting the iPad to work a a tour guide
Celebrity Cruises has gone beyond presenting its wine list on an iPad to become the first cruise line to provide self-guided contemporary art tours using Apple's tablet. The latest "first" closely follows the company's introduction of “Celebrity iLounge” equipped with MacBook workstations, a Mac accessories store and Mac short courses on the ships.  Read More

Sensors sprinkled throughout the home beam information at a set frequency. Wiring wrapped ...
Smart homes of the future will automatically adapt to their surroundings using an array of sensors to record everything from the building’s temperature and humidity to the light level and air quality. One hurdle impeding the development of such intelligent homes is the fact that existing technology is still power hungry and today’s wireless devices either transmit a signal only several feet, or consume so much energy they need frequent battery replacements. Researchers have now developed sensors that run on extremely low power thanks to using a home’s electrical wiring as a giant antenna to transmit information.  Read More
NeuFlow takes its inspiration from the mammalian visual system, mimicking its neural netwo...
The brain’s ability to quickly visually interpret our environment requires such an enormous number of computations it is pretty amazing that it accomplishes this feat so quickly and with seemingly little effort. Coming up with a computer-driven system that can mimic the human brain in visually recognizing objects, however, has proven difficult, but now Euginio Culurciello of Yale’s School of Engineering & Applied Sciences has developed a supercomputer based on the human visual system that operates more quickly and efficiently than ever before.  Read More
The E-Fuel MicroFueler, used in conjunction with the MicroFusion Reactor
A lot of people try to lessen the load on the local landfill by putting their organic waste in a compost heap, but soon there may be something else they can do with it – feed it to an E-Fuel MicroFusion Reactor. The new device, so we’re told, takes cellulosic waste material and breaks it down to nothing but sugar water and lignin powder within two minutes. The lignin powder can be used by pharmaceutical manufacturers (although it’s not clear how you’d get it to them), while the sugar water can be distilled into ethanol fuel. That’s where one of E-Fuel’s other products, the MicroFueler, comes in.  Read More
Diaspora screenshots
The lads behind Diaspora, the open source decentralized alternative to Facebook, have announced the public release of its source code to developers. The group of four students from NYU’s Courant Institute wanted to give users complete control of their details and content in response to privacy concerns regarding Facebook. Upon releasing the source code the developers say, “this is now a community project and development is open to anyone with the technical expertise who shares the vision of a social network that puts users in control.”  Read More
A UC Riverside study have made important steps toward making artificial walking molecular ...
Molecular machines that seem to "walk" in living organisms transporting proteins between cells are the subject of a new study by University of California, Riverside researchers who hope to find out more about how these remarkable machines behave, in a development that could lead to important breakthroughs in medicine and the manufacturing of electronic devices.  Read More
The fuel economy record-setting Avion automobile
Back in 1984, Craig Henderson and Bill Green built a one-of-a-kind super fuel-efficient car called the Avion. In 1986, it set the Guinness world record for fuel economy by averaging 103.7USmpg (2.27L/100km) while driving from the Mexican to Canadian borders. Unlike most autos from that era, the Avion is still on the road... and breaking its own records. In October 2008, Henderson and Green achieved 113.1mpg (2.08 L/100km) on a 263-mile (423 km) trip in the US Pacific Northwest. Then, this August 29th, they departed from Blaine, Washington (adjacent to the Canadian border) and drove 1,478 miles (2,379 km) to the Mexican border. They used just 12.4 US gallons (46.94 L) of diesel and set a new record of 119.1mpg (1.97L/100km).  Read More
The upsized HTC Desire HD and QWERTY slider HTC Desire Z
Just as a successful TV show can yield spin-offs, apparently so it is with mobile phones. Looking to capitalize on the success of its HTC Desire, which launched earlier this year to positive reviews, HTC has unveiled the Desire HD and Desire Z. The Desire HD features a larger 4.3” display and is the first phone to be powered by the new 1GHz Qualcomm 8255 Snapdragon processor. Meanwhile, the Desire Z is a QWERTY slider and is the first to be powered by the 800MHz Qualcomm 7230 processor. In addition to the new hardware, HTC also announced an enhanced HTC Sense experience centered around a new HTCSense.com service that lets users backup, lock, locate and wipe data from their phone remotely.  Read More
The Elonex eTouch tablet and case on display at IFA 2010
Nestled amongst ten new products launched by Elonex at IFA 2010 were a threesome of eTouch tablet computers. Powered by the company's own ARM-based LNX processor and running on the Android platform, there are a couple of 7-inch (17.78 cm) models and a 10-inch (25.4 cm) version – all with backlit touchscreen displays, 2GB of storage and Wi-Fi connectivity. Gizmag visited the Elonex booth to have a look at the e-Readers and tablets on offer.  Read More
Human virus cloning first, new vaccines could result
The cloning of human viruses may sound like the stuff of biological warfare, but breakthroughs in the area are helping in the development of antivirals and vaccines for life-threatening diseases. Now Welsh scientists have made the first complete copy of the virus Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) – a common infectious disease that is responsible for congenital malformations and potentially deadly to transplant patients or HIV/AIDS carriers.  Read More
Motive Industries' Kestrel EV
Canada’s Motive Industries grabbed some headlines last month, when it announced that the body of its soon-to-be-unveiled Kestrel EV was made from a hemp-based bio-composite material. Not only are its panels impact-resistant, but bio-composites in general are said to be lighter, less expensive and/or more ecologically-sustainable than conventional composites. At the time of the announcement, the car’s appearance was being kept under wraps. As part of this week’s Vancouver EV 2010 VÉ Conference and Trade Show, however, all was revealed.  Read More

One of the test subjects playing an action video game (Photo: J. Adam Fenster, University ...
For some time now, it’s been one of those “well-known facts” that playing video games increases one’s hand-eye coordination... much to the consternation of parents and spouses trying to convince family members that their obsessive gaming has no redeeming value. Now, research conducted at the University of Rochester indicates that playing action video games also increases peoples’ ability to make right decisions faster. Ironically, an activity that involves sitting on the couch helps people to think on their feet.  Read More
The Boeing SolarEagle will make its first demonstration flight in 2014 as part of DARPA's ...
The U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency’s (DARPA) Vulture program, which aims to develop and demonstrate technology to enable a single high-altitude unmanned airplane (UAV) to operate continuously for a period of five years, has entered phase II. Under the terms of an US$89 million contract, Boeing will develop a full-scale demonstrator called the SolarEagle that will make its first demonstration flight in 2014. The aircraft will have highly efficient electric motors and propellers and a high-aspect-ratio, 400-foot wing for increased solar power and aerodynamic performance.  Read More
PlayStation Move review (PlayStation 3)
Sony's motion controlled gaming setup, PlayStation Move, has arrived in stores, and if you believe the hype, it's everything we wanted the Wii to be...and more. Is this the future of gaming or just another expensive set of peripherals that will be buried in the back of a cupboard by the end of the year? Read on for our review.  Read More
Researchers claim self-regulating traffic lights would decrease waiting time at red lights...
If you’ve ever been frustrated by stop-and-go traffic, you might have thought that traffic lights just don’t “get” what’s going on around them... and you’d be right. Traffic lights are programmed based on typical traffic patterns for the time and location, but are unaware of what’s actually happening at any one place or time (this wouldn’t include pedestrians hitting walk light buttons, or stopped cars activating sensors embedded in the asphalt). Not only is stopping and waiting for red lights irritating, but it is also a huge source of wasted fuel and extra CO2 emissions. Now, however, researchers have come up with something that may greatly reduce drivers’ periods in the “red light zones” – a system that allows traffic lights to monitor traffic in real time, and coordinate their signals accordingly.  Read More
The photonic chip next to a UK penny. The chip contains micrometer and sub-micrometer feat...
Research conducted at the University of Bristol means a number of quantum computing algorithms may soon be able to execute calculations of a complexity far beyond what today's computers allow us to do. The breakthrough involves the use of a specially designed optical chip to perform what's known as a "quantum walk" with two particles ... and it suggests the era of quantum computing may be approaching faster than the scientific establishment had predicted.  Read More
The Edison2 team accepting a cheque for US$5 million
At a ceremony this morning in Washington, DC, the winners of the US$10 million Automotive X-PRIZE were announced. Not surprisingly to those of us who have been following the competition, the winner of the $5 million Mainstream class prize was Virginia’s Edison2 team, with their four-seater combustion-engined Very Light Car #98. When we were taking in the Finals stage of the competition at the Michigan International Speedway in July, it became obvious by the end of the stage that Edison2 would be receiving some of the prize purse today. Sharing in that loot were the winners of the Alternative class: Switzerland’s X-Tracer team took home $2.5 million for their electric E-Tracer #79 in the Tandem sub-class, while North Carolina’s Li-ion Motors received the other 2.5 for their electric Wave2 in the Side-by-Side sub-class.  Read More
Boeing and Space Adventures plan to offer commercial spaceflight opportunities (Image: Spa...
Boeing and Space Adventures have joined forces to offer "affordable" travel to low Earth orbit for private space tourists. A memorandum of agreement between the two companies could see flights on-board the Boeing Crew Space Transportation-100 (CST-100) spacecraft from 2015.  Read More
Indie filmakers rejoice! Panasonic's AG-AF101 takes on DSLRs
IBC is a globally-important video and content creation show held in Amsterdam each year. It’s where trends emerge and this year it delivered irrefutable proof that the advent of Digital SLRs such as Canon's 5D Mk II has influenced the design of the video camera. The biggest benefit of the huge DSLR sensor is the narrow native depth of field that allows the videographer to isolate a subject. It’s the control which film and TV creatives want, and has seen the 5D spawn an entire industry of gear which turns the still camera into a ripping video camera – in just two years. So successful has the DSLR become as a full-frame video camera, that manufacturers are responding with cameras that take all the DSLR's strengths and add in the features videographers want and/or need. The belle of the ball is undoubtedly Panasonic's EUR 5000 (US$6500) AG-AF101, so Gizmag's Noel McKeegan and Mike Hanlon went to see what all the fuss was about.  Read More
Kawasaki new Z750R sports suspension at both ends plus radial mounts for the four-piston N...
Kawasaki's Z750 has been a top seller in the French, Italian and Spanish markets for its great handling and low price. Triumph's Street Triple R and the Yamaha FZ8 have increased competition in the class, so Kawasaki has responded with a new Z750R variant. The big changes are new suspension at both ends plus radial mounts for the four-piston Nissin calipers for a price in the vicinity of GBP7250.  Read More
A team of biomedical engineers at Taiwan's National Cheng Kung University has created a ne...
A team of biomedical engineers at Taiwan’s National Cheng Kung University has created a new “on-chip” method to identify bacteria. By creating microchannels between two roughened glass slides containing gold electrodes, the researchers are able to sort and concentrate bacteria. A form of spectroscopy is then applied to identify them, providing a portable device that can be used for tasks like food monitoring and blood-screening.  Read More

0 comments:

Post a comment