New and Emerging Technology News part 110 ~ NEW GEN TECH LIFE : new generation technology news

Thursday, 30 January 2014

New and Emerging Technology News part 110

The first Canadian car2go car-sharing program is about to be launched in the city of Vanco...
After first launching in Ulm, Germany in 2008, then subsequently establishing operations in Austin (Texas) and Hamburg, the car2go car-sharing program is now coming to Canada. As of this June, registered members of Vancouver, British Columbia’s car2go group will be able to use any of the 225 purpose-designed Smart Fortwos in the local fleet, which can be picked up and dropped off at designated parking spots throughout the city.  Read More
Apple has issued a public statement, responding to allegations that its iPhones have been ...
Last Wednesday (April 20th, 2011), tech bloggers Alasdair Allan and Pete Warden reported that iPhones and 3G iPads running iOS4 were keeping a secret record of their users' travels in an unencrypted file. While there was no indication that the devices were sharing the data, there were concerns that if a person's phone were to fall into the wrong hands, their personal security could be compromised. At the time of Allan and Warden's posting, Apple had not responded to their inquiries. Yesterday, however, the company issued a statement in which it explained the apparent true purpose of the database.  Read More
Using commonly-available materials, scientists have created a biosensor that detects acute...
In this age of laser-etched microfluidic lab-on-a-chip devices that analyze samples of bodily fluids on the spot, it's kind of ... fun, perhaps, to hear about a similar device that could conceivably be assembled by a grade school student, using their allowance money. The matchbox-sized sensor, developed by scientists from The University of Texas at Austin, is designed to detect acute pancreatitis using blood samples. Important as its purpose may be, though, the materials used to build the device include things like household aluminum foil, milk, a 12-cent LED bulb, and JELL-O.  Read More
The GT3 RS 4.0 is the first production Porsche to wear 'flics', the distinctive lateral fr...
There aren’t many vehicles which can be guaranteed instant classics the moment they’re announced, but the Porsche 911 GT3 RS 4.0 announced overnight, is one of them. Only 600 will be made for worldwide consumption, going on sale in July at GBP128,466, EUR178,596 across Europe and AUD$409,000 in Australia. A roadgoing version of the GT3 RSR race car, the RS sports the biggest 911 engine ever at 4.0 liters, and the most powerful non-turbo 911 engine ever at 500 bhp. It can lap the Nurburgring-Nordschleife circuit in 7:27 if you’re good enough, hits 100 km/h in 3.9 seconds, and comes ready with a half roll cage, seat belt harnesses, fire extinguisher, and a battery cut-off switch if, or maybe when, you get it rubber side up.  Read More
Sharp has installed 156 PN-V601 60-inch LCD monitors and an image transmission system in a...
A new immersive video experience is about to open in Japan that offers visitors the chance to be almost completely surrounded by a huge multi-screen display system while an underwater love story unfolds before them. Sharp has provided the 156 LCD monitors and transmission system for the 5D Miracle Tour's walk-in adventure that's said to offer customers a virtually seamless 200 to 300-inch video experience in front, above and below, and at either side of them.  Read More
The 30 hp Aquawatt - the world's most powerful electric outboard motor
Champions of clean emission boating will be thrilled to know that rapid progress is being made in the field and much larger boats can now be powered by electric motors than ever before. Australian electric outboard motor specialist All4Solar has announced a 30 hp version of its Aquawatt electric motor which will become the most powerful electric outboard motor in the world. Due for launch at next month’s Sanctuary Cove Boat Show on Australia’s Gold Coast, the 30 hp (22 kw) Aquawatt is claimed to be three times more powerful than any other manufacturer’s electric outboard.  Read More
The touchscreen display and lens can communicate independent of the outer frame
By throwing a whole lot of camera wants into a pot, Seattle design house the Artefact Group has come up with a groundbreaking concept that combines all the connected usefulness of a smartphone with the interchangeable lens capabilities of a digital SLR. There's also a novel approach to using wireless technology for communication between the combined lens and sensor and the main body.  Read More
Peugeot SXC Concept Car
Peugeot has dropped the HYbrid4 technology found in its 2010 SR1 Concept into a very different beast for the Shanghai Motor Show. The SXC (which stands for Shanghai Cross Concept) has a 1.6 liter, 160 kW internal combustion engine driving the front wheels and a 70 kW electric motor driving the rear, providing the option of electric-only two wheel drive or a four wheel drive hybrid mode.  Read More
Caterpillars have inspired a soft-bodied robot that can move fast as well as wriggle into ...
The millions of years of natural selection that lies behind the immense biodiversity found on our planet is fertile ground for keeping robotics research rolling ... in this case, literally. Some caterpillars in the Crambidae family have the amazing ability to spring into a wheel shape and roll away when it's time to get out of Dodge fast, and it is this talent that has inspired the creation of GoQBot – a 3-inch cm long soft-bodied robot that could provide a blueprint for versatile search and rescue robots of the future.  Read More
McGill University Biomedical Sensor Glove (Photo: McGill University/Laurie Devine)
When the use of a hand is lost due to a stroke, it’s important to get that paralyzed hand moving again – this allows the brain and the body to “relearn” how to use it. A new approach to this problem has emerged in recent years with the development of powered devices like the Amadeo or the Rehabilitation Glove that enable patients to exercise passively until they recover sufficiently to start moving on their own. Now four students from Montreal’s McGill University have created a prototype stroke recovery glove that would cost relatively little to produce, and that patients can use at home through a video game interface.  Read More

Brisbane's Tym Guitars has housed a 50W combo amp in a foam frame, making the FAMP a light...
As most musicians will tell you, playing in front of a live audience is what makes it all worthwhile. Unless you're successful enough to have a dedicated road crew, though, loading and unloading the equipment can be backbreaking work. All that could change thanks to an experiment in "what if" amp building by Tim Brennan of Brisbane's Tym Guitars. He says that late nights, stupid conversations and an obsession with building things that people might laugh at has resulted in the FAMP – a 50W guitar amp combo encased in a foam housing.  Read More
The Turntable iPhone Dock concept, showing iPhone being docked
For many of us, the digital age has resigned our vinyl collection to gather dust in the corner. There are already numerous devices which offer to convert and clean up the crackly sounds coming through the stylus, so why bother with another flavor? Rather than having to load converted files onto my laptop and then onto my MP3 player or phone, the Turntable iPhone Dock would cut out the middle man altogether and transfer encoded files onto the horizontally-docked iPhone.  Read More
A chemist has developed an 'artificial nose' system, that can identify infectious bacteria...
Being able to quickly confirm the presence of infectious bacteria in a patient’s bloodstream, and then identifying the specific species and strain, can make the difference between life and death for that patient. While traditional detection and identification methods are fairly accurate, they can also take too long to perform. A chemist from the University of Illinois, however, has developed an inexpensive new system that is much quicker – and it works by sniffing out the harmful bacteria.  Read More
The Ringbow touchscreen enhancement device has now entered the prototype stage and is curr...
Without a doubt, touchscreen technology has brought a whole new level of interaction with our devices. Israel's Efrat Barit and Saar Shai, however, believe that the functionality of touch-enabled devices could be greatly enhanced with the development of their Ringbow concept. Worn on the index finger, the ring-like device can be programmed to add extra capabilities to existing actions, activate entirely new touch options, or liberate the user's hands from the surface of the display for Kinect-like, spatial control over touchscreen device operation.  Read More
The PicBand system tethers a pick to a player's wrist or fingers so that it's always withi...
A line of guitar picks attached to a microphone stand has been a common sight at gigs for many years. Should a particularly energetic solo result in flying plectrums heading out over the crowd, the player is thus assured that more are at hand. PicBand takes a different, and very direct, approach to solving the problem – it allows guitarists to wear extra picks on the wrist and also keeps that pesky piece of plastic from wandering off on its own by tethering it to the wrist or fingers.  Read More
Mercedes Benz E63 AMG
More power. Less fuel. That's the bare bones of the latest V8 equipped Mercedes AMG performance model – the E 63 AMG. The car's 5.5 liter biturbo V8 gives it a peak output of 386 kW (525 hp) and torque 
of 700 Nm – add on the optional AMG Performance package and it jumps to 410 kW (557 hp) and 800 Nm. Acceleration is specced at zero to 62 mph (0-100 km/h) in 4.2 seconds, top speed 
is 155 mph (250 km/h - electronically limited) and fuel consumption is down almost a quarter on its naturally aspirated predecessor at 24 mpg (9.8 liters per 100 kilometers). Needless to say, there's some impressive tech underlying these figures.  Read More
Thai politics is one of those subjects which is so far beyond my comprehension that I no longer pay much attention. Until now that is, because one of the parties, the Pheu Thai Party, has announced a "one student, one tablet computer" campaign policy for the next election. If elected, the party will ensure every school has high speed internet access and Wi-Fi, and that every primary school student will be given a free tablet computer. The party plans to improve Thailand's long-term competitiveness by developing forward thinking educational strategies based on e-learning and the distribution of electronic text books via the internet.  Read More
The BCMI lets you create music using nothing more than eye movement and brainwaves
Imagine a Wii that lets you play a musical instrument with your brain without touching strings or a keyboard. That's exactly what this "proof of concept" brain-computer-music-interface (BCMI) is designed to do – it uses brain waves and eye movement to sound musical notes, so even a person with "locked-in-syndrome" could participate in creative activity analogous to learning to play a musical instrument. Developed by a team headed by Eduardo Miranda, a composer and computer music specialist from the UK's University of Plymouth, the BCMI can be set up on a laptop computer for under $3,500 (including the computer). For people who are disabled, assistive technology usually aims at day-to-day functioning and largely ignores the unique aspect of being a human – creativity. This is different.  Read More
The TiGr is a proposed new type of bicycle lock, that uses a titanium bow as a shackle
Bicycle locks are an absolute necessity for anyone who parks their bike in public places, but they can sometimes be a bit bothersome to carry when riding. One alternative is to install a lock mount on the bike’s frame, although some bicycle aficionados would liken that to putting a trailer hitch on a Ferrari. Riders can also use a wearable lock, such as the Hiplok. Another interesting locking innovation could be on the way, however, in the form of the TiGr.  Read More
The US$47 113dB Sonic Boom Skull alarm clock with bed shaker
To many people, it seems almost inconceivable that you can sleep through the aural brutality of an alarm clock, yet a small percentage of us can indeed, mask out all but the loudest of sounds without batting an eyelid. For those people, there is now "The Skull", a Sonic Boom alarm clock on steroids that pumps out 113 db of sound, flashes bright red light from its eye sockets, and strobes bright orange from a strip of flashing lights on the front. If that's not enough to rouse you, the skull comes with the company's "Bone Crusher" bed shaker attachment to shake you back into your body.  Read More
 
The Loowatt system allows human waste to be extracted from special toilets, and placed in ...
Of all the things that people traditionally discard, one that most of us likely think the least about repurposing is human feces and urine. Sure, we recycle our plastic and paper, and compost our fruits and veggies, but ... that stuff? Actually, there are various worldwide projects aimed at using municipal raw sewage for things such as fertilizer or a power source. While those projects only come into play once the waste has been flushed, however, the UK’s Loowatt system gets users involved from the bottom up (sorry), collecting waste directly from the toilet and using it to create biogas and fertilizer.  Read More
The completed velodrome sits at the north end of the Olympic Park(All images courtesy Olym...
One of the four permanent venues in the London Olympic Park, the velodrome was one of the last to be commissioned, and the first to be completed on time and on budget. Unveiled in February, the sinuous velodrome was chosen to represent London's claim for the "greenest games ever," because of its sustainability and efficiency initiatives. Inspired by lightweight and streamlined racing bikes, the Hopkins Architects-designed velodrome will provide a venue for the indoor track cycling events at the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games.  Read More
The Alpha bike prototype features a fully internal chainless drivetrain with electronic sw...
The Alpha Bike is an interesting prototype out of the University of Pennsylvania featuring a fully internal chainless drive that can be switched between fixed gear drive and freewheel electronically. Fabricated entirely in-house, the bike's drivetrain, brake systems and onboard electronics are all concealed inside the custom-machined frame and an LCD display on the handlebars updates the rider on important journey information. Oh, and it looks pretty good too...  Read More
Spinovo wearable back pain relief concept
Industrial Design student Justine Smith has looked to new technology for a solution to one of the most common ailments in the world today – chronic back pain. The result is Spinovo – a concept smart clothing product that uses modular packs to treat pain through heating, cooling, and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) therapies as well as incorporating bend sensors to ensure the wearer maintains the correct posture.  Read More
HBSIA during flight testing in Switzerland (Photo: Solar Impulse)
Solar Impulse is on standby for its first international flight this week. Brussels has been chosen as the destination for the first venture outside Swiss borders, which follows the solar powered aircraft's maiden flight and first overnight flight last year and will mark another important step towards the goal of flying around the world in 2012.  Read More
Toshiba Mobile Display has unveiled a 7-inch touchscreen LCD panel where the capacitive mu...
Toshiba Mobile Display (TMD) has unveiled a 7-inch, 1024 x 600 pixel resolution touchscreen LCD panel where the capacitive multi-touch input functionality is integrated into the liquid crystal cell. The company says that this will allow the production of touch-enabled displays without having to add an additional touch panel to the LCD during the manufacturing process. The technology is initially headed for vehicle-mounted and industrial applications but could well lead to the development of more compact mobile products.  Read More
The freeKEY splash-proof, wireless keyboard can be rolled up and stowed away in a pocket o...
Even though tablet computers are flying off the shelves at quite a pace, less-than-satisfying onscreen keyboard input can lead many to seek a more comfortable alternative. Scosche Industries has released a water-resistant, wireless solution which can be rolled-up so that, like the folding Bluetooth keyboards we've seen, it can easily be taken along for the ride.  Read More
Together with a platform update, Barnes & Noble has given the NOOK Color email, social net...
Barnes & Noble has taken the opportunity afforded by an Android OS update to bring some tablet-like functionality to its NOOK Color e-Reader. The version 1.2 firmware update brings specially-designed apps, full-featured email, enhanced browsing and new multimedia content. It's available now for free manual download but existing devices will be automatically updated via built-in 802.11n Wi-Fi over the coming weeks.  Read More
Apache Attack helicopters reduce vulnerability with new Ground Fire Acquisition System
Firing a rifle at a Longbow Apache Attack helicopter in the hope of claiming a US$8 million scalp with a 50 cent bullet might not be a very good idea for too much longer - unless you like keeping company with a Hellfire missile. The U.S. Army’s Longbow Apache Attack helicopters are about to gain a networked Ground Fire Acquisition System (GFAS) which uses infrared cameras to detect muzzle flashes from ground fire, and displays the location and distance of the shooters as an icon on the pilot’s display screen. Not only does this enable the immediate acquisition and prosecution of targets, it also offers the same information to ground forces via the net-centric battlefield information system, giving everyone in the fight vastly improved situational awareness.  Read More
A diagram depicting how a nanobead-equipped chemical assay device could work (Image: OSU)
Handheld biosensors and diagnostic devices could be taking a huge step forward, thanks to recent advances made in the use of ferromagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles – also known as magnetic nanobeads. According to scientists from Oregon State University (OSU), the use of such particles in chemical detection systems could make those systems much smaller, faster, cheaper to produce, and more accurate than they are presently.  Read More

A class action lawsuit has been filed against Google, alleging that the company hasn't mad...
While fans of Android mobile phones may be taking some satisfaction in the current location-tracking controversy surrounding Apple’s iPhone, they perhaps might not be aware that their own phones are also tracking their movements. Although users reportedly must opt into the Android feature, Detroit-area residents Julie Brown and Kayla Molaski believe that the average user wouldn’t grasp the implications of doing so. To that end, last Wednesday (April 27, 2011) the pair filed a US$50 million class action lawsuit against Android’s parent company, Google.  Read More
A recently-discovered 2009 patent application has many people accusing Apple of lying, whe...
The ongoing kerfuffle over Apple devices allegedly tracking their users’ locations has taken yet another turn. It all started on April 20th, when tech bloggers Alasdair Allan and Pete Warden reported their discovery that iPhones and 3G iPads running iOS4 were supposedly maintaining a stealth file of locations that the devices had traveled to – with their users. Apple responded on April 27th, stating that the devices were simply anonymously contributing to a database of local Wi-Fi hotspots and cell towers, that helped to triangulate the phones’ location faster than GPS alone. Now, however, a just-discovered patent application filed by Apple in 2009 has some people doubting that claim.  Read More
The World’s fastest Alfa Romeo: 190mph 600bhp 8C Spider
When German performance tuner Novitec decided to squeeze some extra performance from the limited edition Alfa Romeo 8C, it didn't need to look far. The 8c runs the 4.7 liter V8 powertrain of the Maserati GT (both companies are owned by Fiat), so it tapped the technology of its sister company Novitec Tridente, which tunes Maseratis, and came up with a supercharger conversion. In so doing, it created the fastest Alfa in the world.  Read More
When attached below the picking area of an acoustic guitar, the Pik'N Board offers players...
For many of us, washing clothes by hand is no longer a necessity. Yet the simple ridged device used before the advent of washing machines is still in production today and continues to be used all over the world. Leaving soapy water well behind, the washboard found a new life in the hands of musicians playing everything from skiffle to dixieland, and jazz to blues. Solo guitar players can now provide their own inexpensive snare-like percussive accompaniment, by attaching a Pik'N Board to their instrument. The mini-washboard is positioned below the picking area of an acoustic guitar, with players extending the pick stroke to tap out a latin beat or scrape in some cajun spice.  Read More
The new iMacs
Apple's desktop lineup has typically pushed users requiring plenty of fast I/O towards the Mac Pro - but the latest iMac refresh has broken the tradition. While quad-core Sandy Bridge CPUs and faster ATI Radeon HD GPUs are welcomed, it's the addition of Thunderbolt ports (one in the 21.5-inch and two in the 27-inch) that really ups the ante for a number of professional users.  Read More
The new BlackBerry Bold 9900 and Bold 9300 smartphones will run on BlackBerry OS 7
RIM's BlackBerry Bold line is set for a major upgrade with the imminent arrival of the BlackBerry Bold 9900 and 9930 Smartphones. Combining the familiar full QWERTY keypad with a new "Liquid Graphics" touch screen, the new models are the first to run on the new BlackBerry 7 OS and pack 720p HD video, built-in NFC (Near Field Communications) technology, a 1.2 GHz processor and the thinnest BlackBerry form factor yet – 10.5 mm (0.41-inches).  Read More
NEC's ArmKeypad technology aims to control devices by taps or claps (Photo: DigInfo.tv)
Fiddling with small buttons or touchscreens on your mobile device when you're running, riding a bike or even just crossing the street can be a frustrating – and dangerous – endeavor. NEC is looking to solve this dilemma by developing a system that enables users to operate devices by just tapping their arm. The ArmKeypad is made up of acceleration sensors worn on each wrist that determine the area of the arm tapped by a user and translate this into different input commands via a Bluetooth link.  Read More
A student at Tokyo's University of Electro-Communications has invented a robotic tongue de...
Services such as Skype have certainly made things a little easier for geographically-separated romantic partners, but when the tele-chat is over and it's time to say good night, sometimes a little air kiss blown towards a webcam just isn't enough. While there are products that cater for the long-distance physical needs of couples, those might be a bit much for everyday situations. There's also the KissPhone, which attempts to simulate the sensation of one partner's lips against the other's. Sitting between those two extremes, however, is the "Kiss Transmission Device" – a prototype gizmo designed to allow its users to virtually lock tongues.  Read More
LG has announced two new notebooks featuring super-thin display technology, 2nd gen Core i...
LG has announced the impending arrival of the first Blade series notebooks. Having a much slimmer profile than the company's first generation of slim notebooks, the two new models both feature new display technology and both are available with second generation Intel Core i processors, NVIDIA GeForce graphics, an optical drive and Wireless-N connectivity.  Read More
DermaFuse, a glass nanofiber material that looks like cotton candy, has been shown to spee...
Many diabetics suffer from a condition known as venous stasis, which can result in wounds on their extremities that remain unhealed for up to several years – if infection sets in, amputation of the limb is sometimes even necessary. Such wounds can sometimes be treated with vacuum-assisted systems, but the equipment required is expensive, and must be carried by the patient at all times. In clinical trials conducted last year, however, human venous stasis wounds were quickly and thoroughly healed with an inexpensive new glass nanofiber material, that looks like cotton candy.  Read More
The C18's in-line controller has a power on/battery status indicator to the top and a powe...
Armour Home recently announced that it has been appointed worldwide distributor of Phitek System's BlackBox range of Active Noise Rejection (ANR) headphones and earphones. Phitek says that the level of ambient background noise can reach 60dB in a busy street, 80dB in the office and up to 94dB in the cabin of a passenger jet. The company claims that its technology is capable of reducing ambient noise levels by 90 percent or more, and I've been sent some C18 in-ear phones for review.  Read More
Merging new technology with vintage audio - the world's first USB ribbon microphone from M...
The relentless march of technology has delivered much of the audio quality once available only in a professional recording studio into the hands of the home recorder. For those who desire a return to the classic mellow warmth of the golden age of terrestrial radio and broadcast television, MXL is about to introduce what is said to be the world's first USB ribbon microphone. Given a vintage look reminiscent of the classic RCA 77-DX model from the late 1950s, the MXL UR-1 cardoid pattern microphone offers CD-quality analog-to-digital conversion and comes bundled with Mixcraft LE recording software.  Read More
Medigus has developed the world's smallest video camera at just 0.039-inches
Medigus has developed the world's smallest video camera at just 0.039-inches (0.99 mm) in diameter. The Israeli company's second-gen model (a 0.047-inch diameter camera was unveiled in 2009) has a dedicated 0.66x0.66 mm CMOS sensor that captures images at 45K resolution and no, it's not destined for use in tiny mobile phones or covert surveillance devices, instead the camera is designed for medical endoscopic procedures in hard to reach regions of the human anatomy.  Read More
Seagate has announced the first 3.5-inch hard drive with 1TB of storage capacity per disk ...
Seagate has set a new commercial benchmark for HDD storage by breaking the 1 TB areal density barrier. The company has announced it will bring the world's first 3.5-inch hard drive with 1TB of storage capacity per disk platter to market in its GoFlex Desk product line, with the 3 TB Barracuda XT desktop hard drive (3 x 1 TB platters) expected to hit shelves in mid-2011.  Read More
Hydromax is a wearable hydration system designed for use in football
When you think of the hazards involved in playing American-style football, things like being slammed to the ground and buried under a stack of bulky opponents probably come to mind. One of the big dangers, however, is dehydration – this is particularly true for children, or athletes in southern states. While water is usually available at the sidelines, players may risk developing heat stroke before they have a chance to get to it. The Hydromax system is designed to keep that from happening, by supplying each player with their own wearable, armor-protected water supply.  Read More
G-form Extreme Sleeve for Laptop put to the test
G-Form has taken its expertise in protecting the bodies of cyclists and skaters and applied it to consumer electronics, first with a case for iPad that's tough enough to withstand a bowling ball attack and now with what's billed as "the world's most rugged case for laptops." Made from a flexible, lightweight material that hardens upon impact, the Extreme Sleeve for Laptop will ship at the end of May in 11”, 13” and 15" sizes. Could be just the thing if you're looking to drop your MacBook off a balcony ...  Read More
Storm chaser Steve Green has put his Tornado Attack Vehicle up for auction on eBay (Photos...
Hey, you wanna drive into a tornado? You could, if you've got somewhere over US$75,000 to spend on the right vehicle. That's the reserve price on the Tornado Attack Vehicle, which has just been put up for auction on eBay. The armored vehicle was made famous by storm chaser Steve Green, who used it in 2004 to become the first person to intentionally drive into – and survive – a tornado. If you're not the competitive type, you could even just "Buy it Now" for a cool $100,000.  Read More
 
The Veltop is a removable windscreen/canopy/side window system, for protecting cyclists fr...
You have to admire the people who commute by bike – regardless of the weather – although riding in the rain seems to involve a choice between getting soaked, or wearing a lot of rain gear and still getting a wet face. Perhaps what such dedicated cyclists really need is a roof, side windows, and a windshield for their bikes. While that may sound like a joke, such a product does actually exist, in the form of the Veltop.  Read More
Intel's 3-D transistors to keep pace with Moore's Law
NASA, the double-helix model, Elvis ... there's a long list of things that emerged during the 1950s which still resonate strongly in 2011, but none more so than the humble silicon transistor. Transistors are the bricks with which the shiny house of modern consumer electronics has been built, but for more than 50 years these bricks have been limited to two dimensions. Now there's a third. Intel has announced that it is putting its revolutionary Tri-Gate 3-D transistor into mass production. The first 22nm microprocessor (codenamed Ivy Bridge) to use the transistors will be rolled-out later this year, delivering huge gains in performance and efficiency compared with chips that use current 2-D planar transistors and helping keep pace with Moore's Law.  Read More
With an LCD display housed within the body of a folder, TV in a Card can bring a brochure,...
It is said that a picture is worth a thousand words, and a moving picture worth even more. Now a company in the UK is enticing businesses to go beyond the confines of eye-catching text, colorful graphics and product photos with TV in a Card. The brainchild of Russell Lawley-Gibbs and Robert Green, a standard TV in a Card folder has A4 (297 x 210 mm / 11.7 x 8.3 inches) dimensions and opening the cover reveals a 4.3-inch, 320 x 240 resolution, 16:9 aspect LCD display powered by a custom board with built-in storage for about 30 minutes of video footage.  Read More
The Zerode G-1 mountain bike incorporates a mid-bike-mounted internal geared hub
It wasn't all that long ago that things like air-sprung shocks and hydraulic disc brakes were just being introduced on mountain bikes. Since then, we've heard about electronic and hydraulic shifting, microprocessor-controlled shock forks, and continuously-variable sealed gearing systems. What's next? Well, how about a bike with two chains and no derailleurs that is claimed to be better than a traditional MTB in four key areas? According to its New Zealand designers, that's what the Zerode G-1 is.  Read More
Researchers have created a thin film flexible smartphone, known as the Paperphone (Photos:...
Researchers from the Human Media Lab at Canada's Queen's University have created a fully-functioning floppy E-Ink smartphone, which they also refer to as a paper computer. Like its thicker, rigid-bodied counterparts, the Paperphone can do things like making and receiving calls, storing e-books, and playing music. Unlike them, however, it conforms to the shape of its user's pocket or purse, and can even be operated through bending actions.  Read More
US$200,000+ Convertible SLS AMG Roadster breaks cover
Though the SLS AMG Coupe is now in showrooms, and we’ve just seen the first images of the 563 bhp convertible version a few minutes ago, they were developed in parallel and they’re apparently so close in so many ways that choice will boil down to personal preference, not driving dynamics. The convertible has an electrohydraulically-operated soft top that can be closed or opened at up to 31 mph, and is claimed to be whisper quiet to its electronically-limited top speed of 197 mph  Read More
Peugeot's EX1 electric concept
French automotive manufacturer Peugeot is celebrating its 200th anniversary this year, and has promised quite a few significant announcements before the year is out. Its first electric car, the Peugeot iOn, is a rebadged Mitsubishi iMiEV, but the EX1 concept it showed last year is all its own work and looks to be a rip-snorter of a performance car to boot. Last week, the twin-electric motored 250 kW (340 bhp) EX1 set a new electric record for the Nurburgring Nordschleife circuit of 9:01.338 at an average speed of 138 km/h in adverse conditions whatsmore.  Read More
The mixing entropy battery could be used to build power plants at estuaries where fresh wa...
Scientists at Stanford have developed a battery that uses nanotechnology to create electricity from the difference in salt content between fresh water and sea water. The researchers hope to use the technology to create power plants where fresh-water rivers flow into the ocean. The new "mixing entropy" battery alternately immerses its electrodes in river water and sea water to produce the electrical power.  Read More
'Quelching' noise as well as light and translucent, a combination that has been lacking in...
Heavy curtains made from thick material such as velvet are often needed to keep noise out of indoor environments, but Swiss researchers have come up with another option. The Empa researchers, in collaboration with textile designer Annette Douglas and silk weavers Weisbrod-Zurrer AG, have developed lightweight, translucent curtains which are five times more effective at absorbing sound than their conventional counterparts.  Read More
Less than 1500 copies of the Liber chronicarum (Nuremberg Chronicle) were printed in Latin...
It’s easy to become blasé in the ubiquitous, 24-7 avalanche of information in which we live our lives – the challenge now is about filtering, organizing and synthesizing information into a useful and relevant form. Think back though to an earlier time when the very first books became available to the public, when the treasure trove of knowledge in our pocket that we take for granted simply did not exist. A book coming up for auction, the Liber Chronicarum (1493), was one of the very first history books available, one of the first printed illustrated books available and its scope is remarkable given it was produced 500 years ago.  Read More

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