New and Emerging Technology News part 111 ~ NEW GEN TECH LIFE : new generation technology news

Thursday, 30 January 2014

New and Emerging Technology News part 111

Richard Taylor is growing fractal nanoflowers from metal nanoparticles, that may someday b...
What do trees, rivers, clouds and neurons have in common? They're all examples of fractals, or irregularly-shaped objects in which any one component is the same shape as the whole – a tributary of a river, for instance, looks like a miniature river itself. Electronic chips are not fractals, yet some researchers are trying to restore sight to the blind by attaching such chips to the eye's neurons. Given that neurons are fractals, wouldn't it work better to hook them up to other fractal structures? University of Oregon researcher Richard Taylor thinks so, which is why he's developing metal "nanoflowers."  Read More
A Harvard team is developing a microbial fuel cell-based mobile phone charger, that would ...
There's no doubt that residents of developing nations can benefit hugely from having mobile phones. This particularly applies to the field of medicine, as the phones allow people living in remote areas to contact health care practitioners, or to use health care apps. Given how unreliable the electrical grid can be in such countries, however, keeping those phones charged can be a challenge. That's why a team from the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) is working on a microbial fuel cell-based charger – a mobile phone charging system that gets its power from microbes in the soil.  Read More
The Jetlev-Flyer in action
We first came across the water-propelled jetpack early in 2009 and since then the company has changed its name to Jetlev Technologies and teamed up with German company MS Watersports GmbH to get the machine to market. Now the first JetLev R200 jetpacks are set to hit the water, and while it won't let you beat traffic on your daily commute – unless your home and workplace are conveniently located along the same body of water – it does look like a whole lot of fun.  Read More
Max Mathews devoted most of his life to learning how computers could aid musicians in perf...
Renowned computer generated music innovator Max Mathews has died at the age of 84. Back in 1957 Mathews wrote the program that enabled an IBM 704 mainframe computer to play a composition lasting 17 seconds – an achievement recognized as one of the first examples of digital synthesis of music on a computer. For the next 54 years Mathews pioneered the field of digital audio research and devoted most of his life to learning how computers could aid musicians in performance.  Read More
The itablet Thumb Keyboard with front facing QWERTY keyboard and rear-facing touchpad
With smaller keys and a lack of tactile feedback, onscreen keyboards found on mobile devices can make inputting anything longer than a search term a real chore. Portable physical keyboards such as the Jorno folding keyboard provide a solution if you're lucky enough to have a desktop or similar flat surface at hand, but if you're taking full advantage of portability and need to enter text while out and about, then a handheld keyboard might be worth considering. The itablet Thumb Keyboard not only puts a physical QWERTY keyboard at your fingertips – well, thumbtips – but also boasts a rear-facing touchpad that lets users provide touch inputs without taking their hands off the device.  Read More
Researchers simulate schizophrenia in a computer (Image: Yellowcon)
One of the theories regarding the cause of schizophrenia suggests that, due to an excessive release of dopamine, the brain remembers too many irrelevant things. Schizophrenics are then overwhelmed by the vast amounts of facts, thoughts and memories all crammed together in their heads, and start processing them into conclusions that aren't based in reality. It's called the hyperlearning hypothesis, and researchers at the University of Texas in Austin recently tried to see if they could simulate it – in a computer.  Read More
The Jaguar C-X75 concept shown last October in Paris, 
is to be produced in a limited ed...
Jaguar’s stunningly beautiful C-X75 hybrid concept 
that wowed Salon L’automobile last October in Paris, 
is to be produced in a limited edition of 250 vehicles with prices beginning at GBP700,000 (US$1.15 million) and running to GBP900,000 (US$1.5 million). The C-X75 will be developed in association with Formula One constructor Williams F1 and though the specification has changed significantly from the Paris car the 330 km/h C-X75 will still be one of the fastest production cars in the world particularly off the line where its 0-60 mph time will be well under the magical 3.0 second mark. Similarly, the electric-only range has more than halved from the concept’s 110 km to just 50 km. The twin 80,000 rpm micro gas-turbine range extenders of the concept car have been replaced with a compact internal combustion engine and there are now two electric motors (one on each axle), instead of the concept’s four. How close the production model will come to the concept’s 780 bhp and 1600 Nm torque output was not revealed.  Read More
The Chip Scale Atomic Clock is a matchbox-sized atomic clock, that uses one one-hundredth ...
Atomic clocks are one of those things that most of us have probably always thought of as being big, ultra-expensive, and therefore only obtainable by well-funded research institutes. While that may have been the case at one time, a team of researchers have recently developed an atomic clock that they say is one one-hundredth the size – and that uses one one-hundredth the power – of previous commercially-available products. It’s called the Chip Scale Atomic Clock (CSAC), and it can be yours for about US$1,500 ... a little more than what you might pay for a regular clock, but not bad for one that varies by less than a millionth of a second per day.  Read More
Olympus has given its Linear PCM audio recorder full 1080p video capabilities in the shape...
It's been a good while since Olympus added to its LS-series of portable audio recorders, but it looks like it was worth the wait. In a company first, the forthcoming release of the LS-20M will see the marriage of full 1080p high definition video capture with 24-bit/96kHz Linear PCM stereo audio. Unlike many pocket-camcorders and similar products like the Zoom Q3, the design sees the autofocus lens positioned between two microphones on the top of the unit at a right angle to the 2-inch color screen on the front.  Read More
A new device is able to non-invasively measure the temperature of patient's brains by meas...
Whether caused by strokes in seniors or hypoxia in newborn infants, brain injuries can cause the brain to overheat, which in turn causes its cells to die. While there are cooling therapies that can bring its temperature down, doctors first need to establish that the brain is indeed warmer than the rest of the patient’s body. While doing so has previously involved invasive techniques, researchers from Children's Hospital of The King's Daughters (CHKD) in Norfolk, Virginia have recently created a small device that sits on top of the patient’s head, and measures their brain’s temperature non-invasively.  Read More

The tilting Swingtrike
Getting about on a bicycle is environmentally friendly, great for your health and cost effective. One drawback – particularly for those learning to ride or for whom balance is an issue – is the instability that comes with being on two wheels at low speeds. Tricycles offer a way to overcome this problem, but three-wheelers have their own set of stability issues when it comes to cornering at higher speeds. Like the Deliver-E Trike we looked at earlier this year, the Swingtrike aims to provide a best of both world solution by employing a tilting design that keeps all wheels on the ground across bumpy terrain and through corners, making it safer – and more fun – than traditional fixed frame trikes.  Read More
The Firebird was designed to be flown either manned or unmanned
Although the use of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) such as Global Hawk and Raven for military information gathering has increased sharply in the last decade due to the maturation and miniaturization of enabling technologies, conventional piloted aircraft can still be a better option depending on the mission at hand. Northrop Grumman has unveiled a new intelligence gathering aircraft called the Firebird that falls into the category of an Optionally Piloted Vehicle (OPV) with its ability to be flown robotically or with a human pilot on board.  Read More
Rand McNally's RV-tailored TripMaker RVND 5510 GPS
With RV's generally used to take their drivers off their beaten tracks, a GPS is pretty much an essential piece of kit on the dash of such vehicles. Aside from dealing with unfamiliar routes, RV drivers also face their own specific route requirements that drivers of smaller vehicles don't have to deal with – as any RV driver who has found themselves at the end of a dead end road and having to carry out a 27 point turn will attest to. While there are a number of GPS units designed for larger vehicles, including trucks, Rand McNally says its new TripMaker RVND 5510 is the first GPS navigation device designed specifically for RVers.  Read More
The Lubricheck analyzes the capacitive and resistive properties of engine oil samples, to ...
Imagine if every time you bought a pair of socks, you automatically threw them out after six months, regardless of their condition. While you would certainly always have newer socks, you would also likely end up throwing away quite a few pairs that could have lasted a while longer. When it comes to changing the oil in our vehicles, most of us do take the “every X miles” approach, however, as there’s no easy way of telling if that oil really needs to be changed ... or is there? The designers of Lubricheck claim that their device will save money and minimize discarded oil, by analyzing samples of engine oil and letting drivers know if it’s still good.  Read More
Sony has given a bass boost, quick charging and ZAPPIN music search to the new additions t...
For a good deal of the 1980s and 90s, Sony's Walkman and Discman players ruled the portable audio roost, and it was almost a given that the company would go on to dominate the world of mobile digital music devices, too. Although Apple emerged victorious in that respect, the Walkman brand has stuck in there and currently has three models listed amongst Amazon's top 50 MP3 players. The latest B-Series additions feature a one-touch bass boost button, a quick charge feature and something called ZAPPIN song search technology.  Read More
Inspired by the sandfish lizard, a new snake-like robot is being designed to burrow throug...
When the sandfish lizard wishes to escape predators, it can actually dive beneath the surface of the sand, and then swim through it. Inspired by the sandfish, researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have created an undulating robot that can likewise swim through a granular medium. While that medium has so far consisted of quarter-inch plastic balls in a lab setting, the team hopes that their robot – or one of its descendants – could someday be used to tunnel through debris to rescue earthquake victims.  Read More
Huey the Color Copying Chameleon Lamp identifies any color that it's placed on, then glows...
Suppose you just love the sage green color of your new desk blotter, and think “If only I could instantly make my whole office this color.” Well, now you can ... sort of. The designers over at ThinkGeek have created a gizmo called Huey the Color Copying Chameleon Lamp, that automatically “reads” any color that it’s placed upon, then glows in that color.  Read More
Thompson made a Renovo-like stand to show off the Splinter Bike at a recent photo shoot
Just over six months after making a joke bet in his front garden, Michael Thompson has lived up to his idle boast of being able to make anything out of wood. Unlike other bike designs where wood is just one of several materials used in the construction - like the duo from Audi and Renovo, which has a hardwood frame - every part of the Splinter Bike is made from either birch plywood, Lignum Vitae, Ekki or an old broom handle. His friend, and accomplished triathlete, James Tully now has the unenviable and certainly uncomfortable task of riding the 31 kg (68 pound) engineering marvel into the record books.  Read More
Continental has announced that its ContiGuard forward-looking braking system will now be e...
More and more, we're hearing about vehicle safety systems that use video cameras to identify hazards. Like us humans, automotive supplier Continental's recently announced ContiGuard forward-looking braking system has two eyes, in the form of two high-resolution CMOS cameras, and a suite of electronics that enables it to analyze the difference in perspective between the left and right views – similar to the parallax shift which our brains also use to create spatial vision when processing images.  Read More
Three recent studies have found that children exposed to organophosphates (OPs) in the wom...
The results of three recent studies have found that children exposed to organophosphates (OPs) in the womb have a lower IQ at seven years than those that have not. Indoor use of two OPs (chlorpyrifos and diazinon) known to be neurotoxicants have been phased out over the past decade because of health risks, however they are still approved for use in agricultural pesticides and are widely used on food crops. Increasingly scientists are finding that prenatal exposure to pesticides may lead to later health impacts.  Read More
 
Archos has given its Windows 7 tablet PC a bit of a performance upgrade - now coming with ...
Archos media players have long been a favorite of mine, offering ease of use and excellent video/audio quality. In 2009, the French consumer electronics company was first to market with a Windows 7 tablet computer and has now announced a new improved version of the Archos 9 PC Tablet. Unfortunately the upgraded version still has a resistive touchscreen and only gets Windows 7 Starter Edition but there is better storage in the shape of a Solid State Drive (SSD) and a more powerful Atom processor.  Read More
ZiiLABS has revealed two new mobile media processors specifically designed to enhance Andr...
Creative's ZiiLABS has chalked up two new additions to its ZMS media processor family that offer Android tablet manufacturers a significant boost in performance over previous versions. The ARM-based ZMS-20 system-on-a-chip is reported to perform four times better than the ZMS-08 launched in 2009, while the ZMS-40 gets an array of up to 96 Stemcell media processing cores for a boost of up to 100 processor cores.  Read More
The Nuu MiniKey case adds a physical sliding QWERTY Bluetooth keypad to an iPhone 4
The Nuu MiniKey case that adds a physical sliding QWERTY Bluetooth keypad – and some bulk – to an iPhone 4 that first reared its head in prototype form at IFA last year is now available in the U.S. The device is aimed at users who prefer some tactile feedback with their typing and now features keys that are flush against each other instead of the chiclet style seen on the prototype. The keys are now also backlit and the backspace key has also been moved to the more traditional upper right corner instead of directly above the enter key.  Read More
Samsung and Acer will be the first to release web-centric Chromebooks running Google's Chr...
Almost two years after Google first announced plans to build an operating system based on its Chrome web browser, the search giant has announced that the first Chrome OS-based netbooks – dubbed "Chromebooks" – from Samsung and Acer are set to go on sale from next month. With no traditional HDD for local storage, the web-centric devices store all the user's apps, documents, and settings in the cloud resulting in some trimmed down devices with impressive boot up times and battery life.  Read More
A working prototype of the virtual trumpet
Bridging the gap between computer generated music and real-world instruments, the "Imaginary Marching Band" is a fledgling, open-source project that allows music to be created by imitating the actions of playing the real thing on a sensor-equipped glove. The work of Scott Peterman, a Masters student at Parsons New School Of Design in New York City, the prototype system uses MIDI data output from the gloves via USB to reproduce the full range of notes from instruments such as the trumpet and trombone.  Read More
Boeing Phantom Ray UAS takes off on its maiden flight (Photo: Boeing)
Boeing has successfully kicked-off its test flight program for the Phantom Ray unmanned airborne system (UAS). The fighter-sized technology demonstrator reached an altitude of 7,500 feet and a speed of 178 knots in its first flight on April 27 in the skies above NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center at Edwards Air Force Base, California. A second successful test flight followed on May 5.  Read More
A new sensor system incorporating protein found in bee venom can detect explosives down to...
Not only do bees play a vital role in agriculture by pollinating plants, but it now turns out that they may help keep us from getting blown up. Researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have shown that bombolitins, which are protein fragments found in bee venom, can be used to detect single molecules of nitro-aromatic explosives such as TNT. If used in sensors at locations such as airports, those sensors would be much more sensitive than those currently in use.  Read More
iPhly is an app and device for iPhone, that allows users to fly radio-controlled model air...
Part of flying radio-controlled model airplanes involves using big, expensive handheld control units. In the same way that iPhones are taking the place of things like debit machines, cycling computers and meat thermometers, however, a new iPhone/iPod touch system could also make such controllers ... well, perhaps not a thing of the past, but no longer a necessity, either. It's called iPhly, and it's just about to hit the market.  Read More
Using a technique known as circuit bending, Reed Ghazala has transformed a talking dinosau...
Ever since a chance encounter with the new soundscape produced by a short-circuited toy amplifier in the 1960s, Reed Ghazala has been randomly exploring audio generation in compromised electronic devices such as talking games and toys. He has written a book on the subject, teaches others to bend circuits, and has created experimental instruments for many well-known artists including Tom Waits and Peter Gabriel. His latest work started life as an educational dinosaur game – which was broken apart, rewired and rebuilt, and then introduced to a plasma globe to become the Radiopool Thereglyph.  Read More
The SR Suntour Swing Shock is a suspension fork designed for use on lightweight commuter b...
OK, so you’ve got the single-speed, skinny-tired messenger-style bike for bombing around town while also looking hip ... that’s a good start, but what piece of functional bling can you add to further identify it as the urban assault vehicle that it is? Well, the folks at SR Suntour would probably tell you to swap your old school rigid fork for their Swing Shock suspension fork for commuter bikes. Depending on whether you’re more of a gadget-lover or a purist, you’ll either think it’s clever, or an abomination.  Read More

Yamaha's Super Tenere
Faced with ever-increasing adventure touring competition from KTM, Yamaha, Ducati and Honda, BMW is ramping up new model development at subsidiary Husqvarna with a view to developing more dirt-orientated large capacity off-road and semi-off-road models that will not be in direct competition with its class-leading R1200GS. Several new models will be unveiled at EICMA in November, all based on the Rotax 800cc parallel twin engine used in the BMW F800R. The Rotax engine, for those not familiar with it is a pearler, with throttle response so acutely calibrated that it can be ridden like this, so the newly developed 900cc variant can be expected to be even better.  Read More
The Twizy Urban
Renault is now taking online reservations for its Twizy two-seater all-electric micro car ahead of its launch in Europe later this year. The announcement made at the Barcelona Motor Show relates to two models – the Twizy 45, which is equipped with a five-horsepower (4 kW) electric motor, and the Twizy, which is equipped with a 17-hp (13 kW) motor and comes in Urban or Technic trims. However, the purchase prices for all variants, which start at 6,990 euro for the Twizy 45, don’t include the battery, which will be leased from the company for a monthly fee.  Read More
Flashkus disposable USB stick concept by Art. Lebedev
Russian-based design studio Art. Lebedev of Optimus keyboard fame has turned its hand to data storage with the disposable, recyclable "Flashkus" USB stick concept.  Read More
How the IMPLUX might look atop a building
When most people think of wind power they think of large-scale wind farms with fields of huge three-bladed horizontal axis turbines. With such farms requiring lots of room they are generally unsuitable for placement in or even near large cities. Smaller turbines tailored for urban environments such as AeroVironment's Architectural Wind System, the Honeywell Wind Turbine and the Windspire represent a growing sector though, and the latest to catch our eye is the IMPLUX – a vertical axis turbine designed to harness the power of the wind blowing from all directions.  Read More
The Elite Car and Castle Tour features 15 supercars (Photo by Como Travel)
Taking in the sights of a foreign land by car isn't a new approach to tourism, but this variation on the theme provides an extra injection of speed – supercar speed. The "Elite Car and Castle Tour" merges old world British castles with high adrenaline track days and luxury driving in 15 of the hottest cars in the world including the Aston Martin DB9 Volante and V12 Vantage, Audi R8, Bentley GT Convertible, Ferrari 430 F1 Spider and California, Jaguar XF, Porsche 997 Turbo PDK, Lamborghini Gallardo LP560-4 Spyder and Maserati Quattroporte.  Read More
Luna is a new personal robot that should reportedly sell for around US$1,000
Ah, the personal robot. While flying cars and jetpacks are now here – for some people – we still don't have robots that help us out around the house. However, maybe we soon could. This week, California's RoboDynamics introduced its Luna personal robot to the world. While the company currently isn't providing too much other information, her(?) makers are calling Luna "a breakthrough in robot design."  Read More
B-Squares are flat electronic modules that can be joined together in different configurati...
Connecting blocks are one of the all-time greatest types of toys. Unfortunately, when we grow up, many of us seem to think that it’s silly to make stuff just for the sake of making it – we still enjoy putting things together, but they have to be functional. That’s where B-Squares come in. The flat electronic modules serve a variety of functions, and can form a variety of devices when connected in different combinations.  Read More
Daredevil Yves Rossy, aka Jetman, has successfully flown across part of the Grand Canyon (...
Yves Rossy, the former Swiss jet fighter pilot better known as Jetman, flew over the Grand Canyon last Saturday (May 7th) using his wearable jet-propelled wing. It was the first time he has flown with the device in North America, having previously used it to cross the English Channel, perform an aerial loop, fly in formation with stunt planes, and to unsuccessfully attempt traversing a stretch of the Atlantic Ocean between Morocco and Spain.  Read More
The Panasonic LUMIX DMC-G3: 16 megapixel sensor, full HD video, and a rotating LCD touch s...
Panasonic has announced the latest addition to its LUMIX G series of not-quite-compact cameras – the LUMIX DMC-G3. Smaller than a DSLR and larger than a pocket point-and-shoot, the G3 offers an interchangeable Micro Four Thirds lens mount, a 16 megapixel sensor, full HD video, and a rotating LCD touch screen.  Read More
How much is this bat worth?
If it is indeed possible for a piece of sporting equipment to contain magic, then a very special cricket bat coming up for auction on June 1 must surely be infused with a healthy dose. It is the bat which Sir Ian Botham used in one of cricket's truly legendary performances, thirty years ago next month – the fabled Headingly test of 1981. How much is it estimated to go for? Have a guess - you won't believe the answer.  Read More

Bella Sky Hotel in Copenhagen (Image: Bella Sky Hotel)
The Bella Sky Comwell Hotel in Copenhagen has opened its doors. The 250 feet (76.5 m) tall, 814 room hotel is among of the largest in Scandinavia, but its not the size of the design from architecture firm 3XN that's striking - it's the shape. The building's tilting twin towers lean apart from each other at an impressive 15 degrees, an angle that provides guests with a better view of the surrounding parkland.  Read More
LG has announced a European debut for its Optimus Black smartphone featuring a 700-nit NOV...
Following previews at CES 2011 and the Mobile World Congress, and boasting pre-orders from 56 network carriers in 50 different countries, LG is set to debut its Optimus Black smartphone in Europe. Slimmer (just) than an iPhone 4, the Optimus Black features a 1GHz processor, front and rear facing cameras, runs on Android 2.2 and its world first 700-nit "NOVA" IPS LCD promises better outdoor visibility, more natural colors and true blacks and whites.  Read More
Genius has released a wireless ring mouse with 1000 dpi thumb-controlled sensor for scroll...
Genius has announced the release of its Wireless Thumb Cursor Controller, or ring mouse for short. The clicking and scrolling action of the lightweight mouse replacement is thumb-controlled, its proprietary optical touch technology offers users 1000 dpi sensitivity and it's said to last a month between charges.  Read More
The new dielectric elastomeric sensors can be stretched to twice their size (Image: Fraunh...
Gauges that determine the amount of strain on an object are commonly used in mechanical engineering research and development to measure the stresses generated by machinery and to test structural elements like aircraft components. The most common type of strain gauge consists of an insulating flexible backing material that supports a metallic foil pattern whose electrical resistance changes as the foil is deformed, which allows the amount of strain to be measured. However, the relatively low elastic limits of the foil restrict the possible applications for such gauges. Now researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute of Silicate Research have developed a sensor that can be stretched to twice its size, dramatically increasing its possible applications.  Read More
Solar Impulse has successfully completed its first international flight (Solar Impulse dur...
Solar Impulse has successfully completed its first international flight. After spending most of last week on standby waiting for favorable weather conditions, the Swiss solar powered aircraft made the run from Payerne to Brussels on Friday 13 May in a flight that lasted 12 hours 59 minutes. Hats-off to the Solar Impulse team!  Read More
Test firing of an LCITS rocket from an AH-1 Cobra helicopter
The Office of Naval Research (ONR) has unveiled a new weapons technology designed to give helicopters, such as the MH-60 and the AH-1 Cobra, the ability to combat the threat of a small boat swarm. The Low-Cost Imaging Terminal Seeker (LCITS) system equips existing unguided Hydra-70, 2.75-inch rockets with a low-cost guidance capability that allows pilots to essentially "fire-and-forget," thereby allowing them to engage multiple, fast attack seaborne targets in a shorter period.  Read More
1926 Rolls-Royce Experimental Vehicle 10EX for sale
Unlike many of the concept cars we see at auto shows that are dummied up with clay, smoke and mirrors, Rolls Royce has always pursued an entirely different philosophy, building fully functioning “experimental vehicles.” Each such car is meticulously hand-built to investigate how the potential production model will operate in real world conditions. The first such vehicle (1EX) was constructed in 1919, predating the 1938 Buick Y-Job (often claimed to be the world’s first concept car) by almost two decades. The “Torpedo” styled 10EX was built in 1926 as a sports car version of the Phantom 1 and after many modifications, lapped Brooklands at an average speed of 91.2 mph. Most importantly, it stayed in the company as a staff car and occasional celebrity courtesy car for six years, being driven by many people of note, such as Lawrence of Arabia who once borrowed it for a European trip. Apart from being exquisitely beautiful, 10EX was one of the world’s first concept cars, has a splendorous and meticulously documented provenance, and … it’s for sale.  Read More
Garcia (center) and Matt Kelly (right) on stage
Jerry Garcia was ranked 13th by Rolling Stone magazine in its "100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time" feature and Garcia’s band The Grateful Dead was ranked 55th by Rolling Stone in its “Greatest Artists of all Time.” Now Garcia’s “Lucky 13” custom Alembic guitar is to be auctioned for charity on eBay on June 5. The recipient charity, Amicus Foundation, is run by sometime Grateful Dead member Matt Kelly (that's Jerry and Matt at work in the piccie) who now works full-time for charity. All proceeds will provide educational opportunities and assistance to hill tribe refugees along the Thai/Burmese border and to underprivileged Thai communities. Go to it deadheads – a piece of GD history and a good cause!  Read More
One of the GCDC participants will be the AnnieWAY team, from Germany's Karlsruhe Institute...
When it comes to developing new technologies, running a competition is always a good way of helping to speed progress. Not only do such events give researchers more of an incentive to develop their ideas to the fullest, but they also give them a chance to see and be inspired by what other people in their field have been working on. While last year’s Automotive X-PRIZE helped usher in utra-efficient yet practical automobiles, hopefully this weekend’s Grand Cooperative Driving Challenge will do the same for cars utilizing cooperative adaptive cruise control (CACC).  Read More
Cornell University's Ranger robot has beaten its own endurance record, by walking 40.5 mil...
On July 6th of last year, Cornell University’s Ranger robot set a world record for untethered legged robots – it walked 14.3 miles (23.01 km) in about 11 hours on a single charge, with no hands-on assistance. The record had previously been held by Boston Dynamics’ BigDog, when it walked 12.8 miles (20.6 km). Both of those achievements were eclipsed last Monday (May 2nd), however, when Ranger beat its own record by walking a whopping 40.5 miles (65.18 km) on a single charge.  Read More

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