New and Emerging Technology News part 73 ~ NEW GEN TECH LIFE : new generation technology news

Sunday, 26 January 2014

New and Emerging Technology News part 73

One of IceCube's digital optical modules being lowered into the ice
After two decades of planning, the world’s first kilometer-scale neutrino observatory should finally be completed by this December. Named IceCube, it will consist of an array of 5,160 optical sensors embedded within one cubic kilometer of the Antarctic ice shelf – to put the accomplishment in perspective, one of the next-largest such observatories is just 40 cubic meters in size. Its main purpose will be to try to establish, once and for all, the source of cosmic rays.  Read More
Apple's updated iPod lineup
Apple’s September 1 event saw the announcement of updates to the entire iPod line with the sole exception of the iPod Classic. The iPod touch gains the same high resolution Retina display and A4 chip found on the iPhone 4, along with FaceTime video calling, HD video recording, 3-axis gyro and iOS 4.1, all packed into a new slimmer, lighter form factor. There’s also a completely redesigned square-shaped iPod nano with a multi-touch interface and a redesigned iPod shuffle that sees the reintroduction of clickable “ring” buttons.  Read More
Raizan and team used optical tweezers to suspend the bead and observe Brownian motion for ...
Einstein said it couldn't be done. But more than one hundred years later physicists at the University of Texas at Austin have finally found a way to witness “Brownian motion”; the instantaneous velocity of tiny particles as they vibrate. The “equipartition theorem” states that a particle's kinetic energy, that due to motion, is determined only by its temperature and not its size or mass, and in 1907 Einstein proposed a test to observe the velocity of Brownian motion but gave up, saying the experiment would never be possible – not so.  Read More
The NuVinci N360 Continuously Variable Planetary (CVP)  transmission for bicycles
Three years ago, Fallbrook Technologies introduced its NuVinci Continuously Variable Planetary (CVP) N170 transmission for bicycles. The device created something of a stir in the cycling community, as it replaces traditional derailleurs with a rear hub containing metal spheres, plus it also replaces distinct gears with a continuously variable system of transmitting mechanical power – kind of like comparing a three-setting desk lamp to one with a dimmer switch. Riders can change gears even when not pedaling, they don’t need to worry about improper chainring/cog combinations, and the fiddly bits aren’t out in the open where the dirt can get at them. The N170 is heavier than a conventional derailleur system, which is why you don’t see it much on bikes other than cruisers. That could change, however, with this Wednesday’s announcement of the NuVinci N360 transmission. Fallbrook claims it has all the good points of the N170, but is 30 percent lighter and 17 percent smaller.  Read More
Apple's shrunk down Apple TV
The “one more thing” at Apple’s September 1 event was an updated Apple TV. Apple has certainly cranked up the ol’ shrink ray for a form factor that is 80 percent smaller than the previous generation. The rumored addition of apps didn’t eventuate nor did the rebranding to “iTV” but, as predicted, the update sees the device sporting an A4 chip and it will only be able to handle a maximum resolution of 720p. Because the new Apple TV does away with local storage altogether in favor of cloud-based storage and streaming of content, Apple says the choice of 720p was more a balance between quality and bandwidth than any rumored difficulties the A4 chip may have with Full HD content.  Read More
The mCube Slim
Power supplies are the bane of the regular business traveler. They're all different, heavy and if you have a few electronic items in your kit, they clutter your baggage and eat heavily into your increasingly stringently-policed baggage allowance. Innergie showed a new addition to its range of mCube universal adapters at IFA today which goes a long way to overcoming all these problems. The mCube slim weighs just 150g, is smaller than an iPhone, can charge two devices simultaneously, fits all common notebooks and will charge almost every other portable device.  Read More
Ford's new Police Interceptor utility
Ford Motor Company has revealed its new Police Interceptor utility. The SUV, along with the new Taurus-based Interceptor sedan that Ford unveiled earlier this year, will replace the Crown Victoria Interceptor sedan when it ceases production in late 2011. The utility reportedly gets at least 20 percent better fuel economy than the Crown Vic, and sports a variety of other features that Ford hopes will make it the vehicle of choice for car-shopping police forces.  Read More
ARCHOS has unveiled five new Android tablets with screen sizes ranging from 2.8-inches (71...
Apple has pretty much defined what many of us now consider to be a tablet computer. When the term is used, we automatically think of a 9.56 x 7.47-inch (242.8 x 189.7mm) iPad. Now, French consumer electronics company Archos is about to have us question that perception with the announcement of five new internet tablets with screen sizes ranging from 2.8-inches (71mm) diagonally across to 10.1-inches (257mm). The new devices will all run on Android 2.2 (Froyo) with support for Adobe's Flash 10.1 player, be powered by either 800MHz or 1GHz processors and sport built-in 802.11b/g/n Wi-Fi.  Read More
The coupling of evanescence waves is key to obtaining higher-efficiency LEDs
One of the biggest challenges in creating a better light-emitting diode (LED) is the search for a way to efficiently extract the light generated in the semiconductor device into the surrounding air, while avoiding the internal light reflection that is cause for a considerable waste of energy. A team of Japanese researchers have recently managed to achieve just that, in what is believed to be a huge step toward significantly more energy-efficient LEDs.  Read More
Miele's smart grid ready appliances can be programmed to run when electricity is least exp...
Miele has announced its new smart grid ready domestic appliances at IFA 2010. These appliances have been designed to start automatically when electricity is cheapest, offering consumers energy savings. The first two appliances featuring smart-grid functionality will be a washing machine and a tumble dryer. The models can also be fitted with Miele’s gateway communication module, providing access to the appliances through a PC and the ability to monitor electricity rates.  Read More

The handy Viewpad 7 features cameras, front and back, and benefits from 3G and Wi-Fi conne...
Somewhere between what we've come to know as a tablet computer and a smartphone sits ViewSonic's new Viewpad 7. You might already guess from the name that this portable tablet with phone functionality sports a 7-inch touchscreen display. It runs on Android 2.2, has both Wi-Fi and 3G capabilities, and cameras at the back and front. The device is currently on show at ViewSonic's stand at IFA 2010 in Berlin, but for those not lucky enough to be in Germany this week, here's a brief summary of what's on offer.  Read More
Researchers have found that localized heating through a microscope tip can modify the prop...
Scientists from the Georgia Institute of Technology have documented a major breakthrough in the production of nanocircuitry on graphene, a material that many envision as the successor of silicon for our electronics needs. Using thermochemical nanolithography (TCNL), the team found that the electrical properties of reduced graphene oxide (rGO) can be easily tuned to reliably produce nanoscale circuits in a single, quick step.  Read More
Reducing your power bill with Microsoft's Hohm
For a lot of people, the electricity bill is an unwanted piece of paper printed with angular graphs and big dollar signs, but with the rising cost of power in today's energy-conscious society it's becoming more important to understand exactly what all those lines and numbers mean. Microsoft's Hohm website aims to make sense of the jargon by providing personalized data on consumers' home energy consumption, and offering recommendations on how to save energy and reduce those bills.  Read More
Made to withstand use on the road while being instrument-finish friendly, the StroboClip t...
Tuner manufacturing veteran Peterson Electro-Musical Products has been helping musicians keep their instruments in check since 1948, and introduced the first true bypass strobe tuner in 2004. Responding to requests from players for a snap-on tuner, the company has announced the StroboClip. The handy tuner benefits from 0.1 cent accuracy, exclusive presets for a variety of stringed and non-stringed instruments, a sturdy, road-friendly design and a pivoted clear screen that makes for easy viewing.  Read More
The eye-controlled earphones developed by DoCoMo could revolutionize the way we control ou...
The Japanese wireless carrier NTT DoCoMo has recently developed and demonstrated a peculiar pair of headphones that can precisely detect a user's eye movements without a camera, and use those movements to control electronic devices such as mobile phones and portable music players. DoCoMo started working on this idea back in 2008 by adapting an electrooculogram (EOG), a medical device used for measuring eye response, to their purposes. An EOG works on the principle that the human cornea has a positive electrical charge. As the user looks to the left or right, the charge shifts in the space between the user's ears – a change that can be easily detected by appropriate sensors.  Read More
Sanyo is about to add some new additions to its eneloop universe series of portable power ...
Since introducing its eneloop rechargeable battery technology in 2005, Sanyo is reported to have shipped over 130 million cells. Now the company has announced some new additions to its eneloop universe series which provide a power boost to a host of mobile devices including Apple's iPad, Sony's Xperia smartphone and Nintendo's DS series portable gaming devices.  Read More
Samsung Galaxy Tab
Apple has defined the market for tablet computers with its iPad and every new release since has inevitably drawn the question – is this an iPad killer? By the looks of things, Samsung's first tablet offering – the Galaxy Tab – could well be. The device trumps its rival on three key points. It's significantly smaller, lighter and more portable, it includes a camera and it works as a phone. We got our hands on the Galaxy Tab during the official launch at IFA today.  Read More
Panasonic unveils its world first 42-inch 3D plasma TVs at IFA 2010
Amongst the plethora of displays out to tempt our eyeballs at IFA 2010 in Berlin were some nice looking new release plasmas from Panasonic. There was the 42-inch TX-P42GT20 that marks the addition of yet another series to the company’s 3D VIERA line-up, along with two new 3D plasmas to join its high-end VT20 series. The new 42-inch and 46-inch models, the TX-P46VT20 and TX-P42VT20, sees the VT20 line-up expand to cover the gamut of 42- to 65-inch screen sizes. The new 42-inch models also mark a world first for 3D plasmas.  Read More
Flying a helicopter isn't just fun, it's also not that hard
James Bond, Evelyn Salt, Jason Bourne... One thing you'll notice about all secret agents (at least, the ones worthy of Hollywood franchise love) is that if they need to get the hell outta Dodge, ANY vehicle will do. These super-spies are just as comfortable behind the controls of a jet plane, a submarine, a tank or a jetpack as you or I are cruising around in an automatic car. Why let them have all the fun? Here's a 5-minute hi-def primer on the basics of flying a helicopter, so you'll know what you're doing next time you 'jack an Apache.  Read More
Sony's 3D VAIO laptop prototype
Sony continued to build out its entire 3D ecosystem at IFA in Berlin last evening when it showed a number of new 3D capable devices, including plans for a 3D IPTV network, a new 3D Home Projector (VPL-VW90ES) and three new network-capable, 3D-ready AV receivers. The biggest hoohah from the media though was undoubtedly a 3D VAIO laptop prototype which will become available in spring 2011, only six months from now.  Read More
 
Professor Kevin Belfield and his team from the University of Florida developed a 'game-cha...
Cancer is an insidious disease, paying no heed to when, where or whom it might strike. But scientists continue to wage a war against it, hoping to claim the ultimate prize – a cure. Latest research from chemists at the University of Florida suggests a new technique using near infrared light could help scientists to view and photograph lysosomes – sac-like structures within cells – that are linked to cancer and other diseases.  Read More
A model of the implantable bioartificial kidney shows the two-stage system
End-stage renal disease, or chronic kidney failure, affects more than 500,000 people per year in the U.S. alone, and currently is only fully treated with a kidney transplant. That number has been rising between five to seven percent per year and with just 17,000 donated kidneys available for transplant last year the waiting list currently exceeds 85,000, according to the Organ Procurement and Transplant Network. Those who can’t secure a kidney for transplant are left reliant on kidney dialysis. An expensive and time consuming process that typically requires three sessions per week, for three to five hours per session, in which blood is pumped through an external circuit for filtration. In a development that could one day eliminate the need for dialysis, researchers have unveiled a prototype model of the first implantable artificial kidney.  Read More
The all-electric Ford Focus will use liquid cooling/heating for its lithium-ion battery sy...
One of the downsides of the lithium-ion battery systems used in electric vehicles is that their performance, reliability, safety and durability can be negatively affected by extreme temperatures. When the all-new Ford Focus Electric debuts later this year in the U.S. it will be powered by a lithium-ion battery – no news there. What is interesting, however, is that the battery system will use cooled and heated liquid to regulate battery temperature, which should extend battery life and maximize driving range.  Read More
Toshiba's Libretto w100 incorporates Immersion's haptic effects
Are you the sort of person who loves touch screen technology but yearns for the mechanical feel and security of a real keyboard? You may be interested to hear that Toshiba’s Libretto w100 dual touch-screen mini notebook will be the first device to hit the market that incorporates Immersion Corporation’s TouchSense 2500 solution that provides touch feedback effects when hitting keys. The haptic effects help to minimize the chance of mis-keying, provide immediate tactile response and allow you to get all touchy and feely at the same time.  Read More
Burning Man 2009 (Image: JahFae)
Burning Man, the popular desert music festival, is this year featuring a free, solar powered cellular network for the duration of the festival which winds up on Monday. The open source software, OpenBTS (Open Base Transceiver Station) is a low-cost replacement for traditional cell networks. It allows mobile phones to connect to each other if they're all within range of the transceiver, or to connect with any other phones with Internet connection. It utilizes a Universal Software Radio Peripheral (USRP) to create a GSM air interface on any standard GSM mobile phone. The founders of Burning Man, which began this week in Black Rock City, Nevada, have decided to trial the system by allowing the 50,000 or so attendees free access to the network.  Read More
A test of the Multiple Memory Material Technology
They’re known as smart materials, memory materials or shape memory alloys, but it all boils down to the same thing: materials that hold one shape, but then take on another at a certain temperature. Such substances have been around for decades, but now researchers at Canada’s University of Waterloo have taken them to a new level. Using a patent-pending process, they can embed multiple shape memories in one object – in other words, while memory materials can presently take on only two shapes, going from one to the other at just one temperature, using the new process they could take on several shapes at several temperatures. The Multiple Memory Material Technology (MMMT) is said to work with virtually any memory material.  Read More
The Rydeen GCOM701 tablet/GPS navigation device
Integrated silicon solutions company, Marvell along with Rydeen Mobile Electronics have announced the Rydeen GCOM701, a new Android™ tablet. The GCOM701 features built-in Wi-Fi, GPS, Bluetooth capability, removable memory, a front-facing camera and easy connectivity for jump drives, along with an internal microphone and speaker, enabling the use of Internet-based communications services such as Skype. A 7 inch TFT touch panel with 800x480 pixel resolution, which also provides ability to surf the web, read e-books and view photos or videos. Whilst on the road, the GCOM701 functions as a portable navigation device, including four million points of interest. The 7.4 volt battery provides considerable standby time and 6 hours of operational time.  Read More
One of the sound-generating carbon nanotube sheets
Two years ago, Chinese scientists coated one side of a flag with a thin sheet of nanotubes, then played a song using the flapping sheet-coated flag as a speaker. It was a demonstration of flexible speaker technology, in which nanotubes can be made to generate sound waves via a thermoacoustic effect – every time an electrical pulse is sent through the microscopic layer of nanotubes, it causes the air around them to heat up, which in turn creates a sound wave. Now, an American scientist has taken that technology underwater, where he claims it could allow submariners to detect other submarines, and to remain hidden themselves.  Read More
Samsung's Slanted lens HMX-T10 camcorder
Tilting LCD screens that let users keep an eye on the action when holding a camcorder up high or down low are pretty much standard nowadays, but they don’t help reduce the arm and wrist fatigue that results when holding the device in such positions. The new HMX-T10 camcorder unveiled by Samsung at IFA 2010 does, however, by featuring a Slanted lens that tilts 20 degrees to allow users to keep their desired subject in frame, while holding the camera in a more comfortable position.  Read More
Philips unveils its Airfryer at IFA 2010 in Berlin
Fried food without oil... is such a thing possible? According to Philips electronics, the answer is yes. Philips recently unveiled their Airfryer at the IFA consumer electronics show in Berlin, where we were on hand to check the device out. It’s still early to be making any sweeping statements, but this product could have a huge impact on the developed world’s obesity epidemic.  Read More

Sony has announced a touchscreen version of its Bloggie pocket video camera which can reco...
Not so long ago, Sony took its original Bloggie pocket video camera and placed a 270 degrees swivel lens at the top that was said to cater for those spontaneous moments. Now the next generation of Bloggie has been revealed and the swivel lens has gone. In its place is a fixed F2.8 wide angle, auto-focus lens with 4x digital zoom. The new MHS-TS20 and MHS-TS10 Bloggie Touch pocket camcorders have a 3-inch touchscreen display, can shoot up to full 1080p high definition video and are capable of snapping 12.8 megapixel still images.  Read More
The Solidey ionic toothbrush is claimed to be able to clean teeth using only light and wat...
In Japan and much of Europe, the Soladey toothbrush is nothing new. It was invented 20 years ago, and is currently used by over 16 million people – you may now pause to make a joke about 16 million people all using the same toothbrush. Just recently, however, it has become available in the U.K., U.S. and Canada. What makes it special is the fact that it uses nothing but light and water to clean your teeth.  Read More
Harvard's PARITy differential for MAVs
Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs) are in development at various research institutes and aerospace firms worldwide, with an eye toward someday being used in applications such as search and rescue operations, environmental monitoring, or exploration of hazardous environments... or spying, as seems to be the case with all things micro. Like insects, many of these MAVs fly by flapping a set of wings, so they need to be designed to cope with crosswinds or potential wing damage. Engineers at Harvard University have created a tiny automobile-style differential, to keep the two wings generating the same amount of torque. The device is literally one one-millionth the size of what you’d find in your car.  Read More
NASA's Solar Probe Plus mission will uncover some of the long-standing questions about the...
In an effort to explore what is perhaps the last salient region of our solar system yet to be visited by a spacecraft, NASA has announced Solar Probe Plus, a mission that will launch a probe directly into the sun's atmosphere. The mission will seek to answer some of the outstanding questions about the nature of our very own star, while helping to understand and forecast the radiation environment in which future space explorers will be living and operating.  Read More
The UK's Royal Mail has issued the world's first augmented reality postage stamp which, wh...
Nestled amongst a set of postage stamps celebrating Great British Railways is a world's first. The UK's Royal Mail calls it an "intelligent stamp" and pointing a smartphone camera at it delivers exclusive online content to the screen. The first piece of enhanced content features a special poetry reading by actor Bernard Cribbins.  Read More
LG's 31-inch 3D OLED TV at IFA 2010
LG is expanding its OLED TV line-up with a 31-inch, 3D capable model on show at IFA 2010. The new, super-slim 3D TV will join the company's existing 15-inch model on the market next year and LG says it plans to extend the range even further during 2011.  Read More
Hardly a sound from the counter-rotating propellers as the Green Cri takes to the air
When Gizmag paid a visit to the Paris Green Air Show in June, there was one craft on display that seemed to steal the show. The Green Cri aerobatic electric airplane hadn't even left terra firma, yet was surrounded by eager onlookers for much of the time it was there. Now the four-engined prototype has returned to Le Bourget airfield for its maiden flight in the sunny skies above Paris.  Read More
Toshiba's Folio 100 media tablet at IFA 2010
Toshiba Europe has chosen the IFA consumer electronics show to unveil its 10.1-inch Android media tablet powered by NVIDIA's Tegra II processor. The Folio 100 features an onboard camera, Wi-Fi and Bluetooth (with a 3G model in the pipeline) and a HDMI port for viewing content on a big screen television. The company has also announced the development of an one-stop portal to access and share online content over numerous device formats. We couldn't resist the opportunity to take a closer look.  Read More
Researchers at UCSD have figured out a way to harness the unused transistors in a chip to ...
Adopting a new, highly automated and reconfigurable approach to hardware acceleration, researchers at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) have come up with a way to harness the unused silicon real estate in smartphones – the so-called "dark silicon" – as special-purpose processors dynamically optimized to perform the most common tasks in an efficient way.  Read More
Roland has announced four new additions to its popular Cube guitar amp family and two new ...
With over a million sales notched up, Roland has announced that the next generation of Cube amplifiers is ready to be let loose. The Cube XL series is available in four sizes, starting at the practice 15W version right up to a gig-worthy 80W model. The amps all feature a host of tones and effects and an auxiliary input to allow a portable music player to provide backing tracks. Features on offer from the new range include amp modeling, channel-switching and a strange-sounding power squeeze function. Roland has also unleashed a couple of BOSS guitar effects pedals – one that offers the player pitch control and voice harmony possibilities and the other squeezing some tube amp sounds into a palm-sized stomp box.  Read More
 

Didn't Uncle Fester do this years ago?
Now here's something we've never seen before – a rechargeable lightglobe. Chinese company Magic Bulb has patented a new type of device which incorporates a battery and LED lightblobe to produce a lightglobe which uses only 4 watts but produces the equivalent light of a traditional 50W globe. If the power fails, the globe will keep running for around three hours or it can be screwed out of its socket and the handle extended to turn it into a bright torch.  Read More
The P5 Headphones from Bowers and Wilkins
Bowers & Wilkins (B&W), the company that boasts the distinctive Zeppelin iPod dock, Nautilus and Panorama amongst its line of high-end speakers, has made its first foray into the headphone market with its P5 Mobile Hi-Fi Headphones. With a slim design and great sound reproduction that provides warm bass and stunning clarity through the mid-range and high-end, these headphones would have to be the most comfortable – and amongst the most impressive – headphones I’ve ever wrapped around my noggin.  Read More
The Sony Walkman started the portable music revolution and is still hanging in there
Leading up to Apple's big iPod refresh last week, Sony managed to steal some spotlight as headlines around the Internet proclaimed how the company's Walkman had outsold the iPod for the month of August in Japan. According to a market survey from BCN Ranking, the Walkman holds a 47.8 percent market share, with the iPod now suddenly trailing at 44 percent.  Read More
The new dual-row pin memory card design
The SD Association is celebrating ten years this year and it used Europe's largest consumer electronics show – IFA – to announce a new, dual-row pin memory card design with data transfer speeds of up to 300 megabytes per second for SDXC and SDHC devices and memory cards. It is fully backwards compatible, allowing equipped devices full use of any SD, SDHC and SDXC memory cards and will be part of the forthcoming SD 4.0 specification, expected in early 2011.  Read More
Telefunken evaluating electric bicycle prototypes
If there’s an interesting aspect to the rise and rise of electric mobility devices, it’s the number of companies that were once associated with vastly different fields which are now investigating the arena of electric bicycles. At SinoCES in China last month we saw a white goods manufacturer proudly showing a new range of electric scooters alongside its new range of washing machines. At IFA today we spied yet another big name on two electric bicycles – 107 year-old German electronics company Telefunken.  Read More
Commodore USA has revealed its plans to release an Amiga-branded all-in-one keyboard compu...
Only a few short days ago, Commodore USA announced its intention to launch a modern version of the legendary C64 all-in-one keyboard computer. Now the company has revealed an exclusive licensing agreement with Amiga Inc. that should result in the company releasing upgraded Amiga-branded machines. As well as a technical overhaul, the new computers are to be fully compatible with the updated version of the AmigaOS operating system.  Read More
And Vinyly provide the perfect resting place for you in vinyl
If you've ever imagined the song you'd like to be played at your funeral or you imagine it to be the send-off of the year, then you might be interested in And Vinyly. This UK-based company will press your cremated ashes into a vinyl playing a track of your choice or a vocal message for your friends and family to enjoy and remember you by. Hmmm.  Read More
Microsoft has unveiled a touch sensitive version of its Arc mouse, the Arc Touch, which al...
Microsoft has revealed the next stage in the development of its Arc Mouse, the Arc Touch. As the name implies, the company has incorporated some touch sensitivity into its upper surface and also designed it to flatten out at the touch of a finger, for convenient transport while not in use. Its wireless USB transceiver also fits snuggly in the peripheral's underside to help ensure that everything you need is in one place when you're on the road.  Read More
New laser technology could be used to protect military helicopters from heat-seeking missi...
Researchers at the University of Michigan are developing laser systems for protecting military helicopters from heat-seeking missiles. The lasers wouldn’t shoot down the missiles, but would instead jam their sensors, essentially blinding them. This isn’t the first time that laser systems have been used for this purpose, but the creators of this system claim that it is better suited to helicopters than anything that has come before.  Read More
Lidija Pritrznik, Creative Director and member of Gorenje's design team designed the SmarS...
With its retro good looks and smooth lines, the SmarSofa from Gorenje wouldn’t look out of place on an Austin Powers movie set. On display at IFA 2010, the SmarSofa is not just a convertible lounge. It includes a fully integrated fridge which contains remote-controlled, rotating cooling platters. At the touch of a button the platters containing ready-to-eat dishes can be lifted and lowered to the desired height. How’s that for groovy?  Read More

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