New and Emerging Technology News part 59 ~ NEW GEN TECH LIFE : new generation technology news

Saturday, 25 January 2014

New and Emerging Technology News part 59

Can the Flipout square up to the smartphone competition?
It's now hip to be square. After the customary rumor onslaught, Motorola has finally got round to making its quadratic new mobile phone official. Hiding behind its 2.8-inch display is a full QWERTY keyboard that slides out on a pivot, hence the chosen name for the device - the Flipout. The Android smartphone allows users customizable views of social network feeds, photos snapped with its camera can be uploaded to sharing sites with the touch of a button and conversations benefit from audio enhancement technology.  Read More
AeroVironment's Raven UAS
U.S. forces deployed just 13 unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) at the beginning of the Iraq war in March 2003, but although the potential of surveillance and combat aircraft that don't put pilots in the line of fire has always been clear, few would have predicted just how quickly this technology would transform modern warfare. The proof? The U.S. Army has recently surpassed one million unmanned flight hours and is now using 333 different types of unmanned aerial systems in Iraq and Afghanistan... and the growth curve isn't about to level out.  Read More
The microwave-trapping omnidirectional electromagnetic absorber
Researchers at Southeast University in Nanjing, China have created a device that traps and absorbs electromagnetic waves coming from all directions, spiraling them inwards without any reflections, essentially creating an electromagnetic black hole. Qiang Cheng and Tie Jun Cui’s “omnidirectional electromagnetic absorber” draws in microwaves coming from any direction by spiraling radiation inwards, and converting its energy into heat. They plan on developing a device that can absorb visible light next.  Read More
A breakthrough in quantum dot laser communication could mean the next-generation Ethernet ...
A collaboration between Fujitsu and the University of Tokyo achieved a record 25Gbps data communication link using quantum dot laser, a low-cost technology that can reliably handle high-speed data transmissions while consuming minimal power. With good performance and wide margins for further improvement, this development paves the way to the next generation of high-speed Ethernet data communications, which will see a tenfold increase in transfer speed.  Read More
Aiptek's Story Book inColor is the first color ebook designed for children
With the flood of ebook readers hitting the market over the past year, not to mention the success of Apple’s iPad, any new offering needs to differentiate itself if it is going to survive. That’s exactly what Aiptek’s Story Book inColor has done because, instead of aiming at the overcrowded adult market, it has focused on the children’s book market and in doing so, has the entire market to itself.  Read More
The WayPilot system uses radio transponders to alert drivers when they're drifting out of ...
More and more cars are integrating driver assistance features that help do things like avoid collisions, keep a safe distance from other vehicles, or even parallel park. There are also Lane Departure Warning systems that use onboard cameras to keep the driver from drifting out of their lane. But what happens if the roadside markings are worn away, or covered with snow or mud? Norwegian research organization SINTEF has come up with a solution called WayPilot – a system which uses sensors embedded in the asphalt and a shaking steering wheel to alert drivers before they stray too far off course.  Read More
Multiple layers of graphene are being advanced as a new solution to fight overheating in e...
Overheating in laptops and electronic gadgets isn't just an annoyance to the end user — it's a major technological hurdle that puts a hard limit to the speed and energy efficiency of electronics. In a paper recently published on the journal Nature Materials, a team of scientists from the University of California found that multiple layers of graphene show strong heat conducting properties that can be harnessed in removing dissipated heat from electronic devices.  Read More
Decon Green keeps terrorist attack sites... green, so to speak
If a terrorist attack has left an area contaminated with nerve gas, chances are no one wants to add any other noxious substances to it. Using conventional chlorine- and lye-based decontamination agents, however, that’s exactly what’s happening. Not only can these substances run off and harm people or the environment, they can also react with the very materials they’re cleaning up, forming new toxic substances. It is for reasons such as these that the US military has developed Decon Green - a non-toxic set of ultra-strength cleaners.  Read More
Delta Electronics has unveiled a magazine-sized color e-Reader at Computex
So how do you stand out from the e-Reader crowd at Computex? You pop up with the only color A4 sized e-paper device, that's how. Rather than using e-Ink or LCD technology, the 13 inch color display of the e-Magazine from Delta Electronics benefits from e-paper technology developed in partnership with Japan's Bridgestone Corporation.  Read More
Artists rendering a String Transport system
Trains might be a reasonably cheap transport option - but rail infrastructure is very costly to build. Monorail, maglev systems and high speed rail are more expensive again - and prices really skyrocket when you have to build bridges, tunnels and winding mountain routes, or cover difficult terrain. Which is why Anatoly Unitsky's String Transport Systems look like they've got so much potential. The system uses solid steel/concrete rails, reinforced with extremely high tension steel wires, to provide an efficient and smooth rail system anywhere between 3 to 30 meters above the ground. It's earthquake, hurricane and terrorist-proof, and capable of supporting vehicle speeds over 500 kmh, too, making it a genuine high-speed rail alternative, for a fraction of the price of road or ground rail alternatives. Fascinating stuff!  Read More

This US Navy Laser Weapon System shot down two UAVs on May 24th
If you own an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV), here’s piece of advice: don’t fly it near San Nicholas Island, California, or it could be blasted out of the sky – by a laser. Two such vehicles were successfully shot down there on May 24th by a US Navy laser weapon. According to the official press release, this marks "the first detect-thru-engage laser shoot-down of a threat representative target in an over-the-water, combat representative scenario.”  Read More
Prior to Computex, ASUS revealed a few teaser details about upcoming releases. Now more de...
In the week before Computex, ASUS gave a little teaser preview of the kind of tech to expect from the Taiwan giant. As promised, here we take a quick look at what all the self-generated fuss was about.  Read More
Sonic Charge Patternarium
I've been a registered owner of Sonic Charge's ┬ÁTonic (pronounced MicroTonic) drum/percussion synthesizer for years - but a new online tool from Sonic Charge called Patternarium is likely to make it one of my most used plugins when I'm looking for some inspiration in the studio. They're calling it a "giant collaborative patch randomizer," and my explanation of that won't fit in this summary.  Read More
A tumbleweed rover being tested in Antarctica (Photo: NASA)
For over ten years, NASA engineers have been kicking around the idea of a tumbleweed-inspired Mars rover. This “tumbleweed rover” would be a rugged but lightweight ball, with sensors and other electronics securely suspended inside. It would move about simply at the mercy of the Martian wind, much like its botanical namesake. Until now, the only way of testing such rovers has been to build a prototype, then set it loose here on Earth and watch the fun. That could be about to change, however. Researchers at North Carolina State University have developed a computer model that can test tumbleweed rover designs before they’re ever built.  Read More
Clothing incorporating Wearable Absence technology
You’ve had a hard day at the office, your spouse is currently over 2,000 miles away and now your boss says he wants you to work late. It’s all you can do to contain your anger until you get into the bathroom, whereupon you let loose with a string of red-faced, high-cardio profanity. At that point, your spouse talks to you via your shirt. “Take it easy, it’s all right,” they coo from your collar, as they play your favorite song, and photos of them scroll across your chest. Hey, it could happen. No, really, it could happen, thanks to the Wearable Absence project. Researchers involved in the program are working on developing intelligent textiles, that comfort the wearer by evoking memories of absent loved ones.  Read More
What do you get when you cross a sex toy with a bicycle seat?
What will they think of next? I came across the Ample Star Massaging Bicycle Seat by accident in the penny booth section of Asia's largest computer fair, Computex. It's akin to those massagers sold in department stores that are not there to soothe aching muscles so much as facilitate orgasm for females who don't want to have a sex store come up on the credit card statement. The major difference is that this one also serves as a giant flashing taillight, broadcasting your favorite dance rhythms to fellow road users.  Read More
The Japan Electric Vehicle Club's record-setting Mira EV
Giving us yet another reason to get behind electric, the Japan Electric Vehicle Club recently exceeded its own Guinness record for longest distance driven without recharging, achieving a staggering 1,003.184 km (or about 623 miles).  Read More
Commodure USA has revealed some specification details for its new Invictus keyboard comput...
What goes around, comes around - so goes the saying. Many moons ago a certain computer-in-a-keyboard affectionately coined the C64 took over the world and gave a whole generation a taste of things to come. Now Commodore USA has given the keyboard computer a modern facelift, resulting in an all-in-one solution powered by an Intel Atom processor and sporting a 5 inch touchscreen display.  Read More
PMA 2011, Las Vegas set to open its doors to the public for the first time
The dates for 2011’s PMA International Convention and Trade Show have been confirmed. In an unexpected twist, rather than being held in its traditional first quarter slot, the convention has been moved from February to September. The event will now be taking place September 8-10, 2011, in the South Hall of the Las Vegas Convention Center. The shift in dates has been attributed to changes in “industry buying cycles and technology developments." More significant, though, is the announcement that the convention will be open to the public on September 10, with photo enthusiasts welcome throughout the day.  Read More
Nokia's Bicycle Charger Kit a stroke of genius
Cyclists are already doing their bit to help the environment by eschewing a fossil-fuel guzzling transport option. Now they can do a little bit more using Nokia’s newly unveiled Bicycle Charger Kit which lets cyclists charge their mobile phone using pedal power. The kit employs a bottle dynamo that is driven when in contact with the front wheel like those found on ye olde time bicycle lights.  Read More

The Escape Rescue System can transport rescue personnel up the building and evacuate build...
There would be few scarier places to be in the event of a fire than in a high-rise building with no means of escape. Tragedies such as the World Trade Center disaster have highlighted the vulnerability of the building’s core and emergency stairwell as the only venue for evacuation. We've seen some last resort options that cater for those individuals brave enough to rappel or even parachute from the building, but that's still only part of the equation. When escape routes are compromised it not only prevents evacuation, but also prevents emergency personnel reaching the trouble spots. Escape Rescue Systems' solution is to use collapsible cabins which can be lowered over the side of the building to transport rescue personnel up... and evacuate building occupants down.  Read More
The Panvista Borescope Package
One the many hidden gems we stumbled over at Computex 2010, the Panvista Borescope Package consists of a tiny fiber optic video camera, joined via a long flexible tube to a 3.5 inch hand-held color LCD monitor. The camera head is equipped with four Infrared LEDs, allowing it to see in the dark. Besides other useful applications, the camera can be used to peek inside a car’s engine via the spark plug hole.  Read More
The Koegler AudioMouse combines a computer mouse with a phone
You might, at first, wonder why anyone would want a combination mouse and phone. Well, if you’re working on the go from a laptop, or have limited desk space, it saves you the hassle of managing both devices separately. That, at least, is the thinking behind Koegler Electronics’ AudioMouse, recently spied by Gizmag at Computex 2010.  Read More
A cyclist with a stinky cracked helmet (Inset: one of the odoriferous microcapsules)
We’re told that we should replace our bike helmets every couple of years or so, because minuscule cracks can develop over time, rendering them structurally unsound. For the same reason, we’re supposed to replace a helmet that has withstood a direct impact immediately, no questions asked. The problem is... it’s so hard to get yourself to throw away what looks like a perfectly good helmet, just because it might no longer be effective. New technology developed at the Fraunhofer Institute for Mechanics of Materials should eliminate this situation. When your helmet is getting past its prime, it will start to smell. If it develops any large cracks... well, you’d better plug your nose.  Read More
Jobs: iPhone 4 is the biggest leap since the original
As expected, Apple today pulled the wraps off the fourth generation iPhone at the WWDC conference in San Jose. While the phone didn't receive its expected iPhone HD monicker, it's certainly as HD as a phone is likely to get any time soon, with a 960 x 640 resolution equalling a whopping pixel density of 326 pixels per inch. Read on for the rest of the new features.  Read More
The unique form-factor of the DVX-5D8 3D camcorder from DXG
In case you hadn’t heard, 3D is the big news in entertainment this year with all the big players releasing 3D capable sets designed to tempt the eyeballs and loosen the purse strings. Unfortunately, there’s still a bit of a shortage of native 3D content and the opportunities to create your own are largely limited to the world of deep-pocketed professionals. That looks set to change with a couple of less well-known players, Aiptek and DXG, staking an early claim on the 3D consumer camera market. We checked out their offerings at Computex 2010.  Read More
Justin Campana's home-built Carbon Tablet with 13.4 inch resistive touchscreen display, Wi...
Rather than make do with an iPad or wait for other manufacturers to create the desired "Windows 7 touchscreen tablet with a large screen that could handle HD video and wasn't too thick or power hungry," Justin Campana decided to try and create his own. The process involved breaking open an MSI X320 notebook, overlaying a touchscreen interface and creating custom carbon fiber casing to house the new 13.4 inch high definition LED backlit touchscreen tablet with accelerometer and SSD storage.  Read More
The distinctive lines of the Orochi Gold Premium sportscar from Mitsuoka Motors
The Orochi sports car first appeared as a concept vehicle based on the Honda NSX platform at the Tokyo Motor Show in 2001 before undergoing some updates and revisions and finally being put into production and offered for sale in late 2006. The company now unveiled the Orochi Gold Premium model.  Read More
Sony LX900 features Face Detection and Presence Sensor technology
Are you one of those people who like to have the TV on just for a bit of background noise? Or perhaps you'll leave it on while you're surfing the net or reading a book, in the hope that whatever comes on next will be a bit more interesting. If this sounds like you, then you might stand to save a few dollars on your power bills should you decide to get one of the new Sony Bravia TVs with Face Detection and Presence Sensor technology. These new features, which will dim or turn off the screen if you look away or leave the room, are included in the new Sony LX900 3D TVs due out any day now. Whilst Hitachi also appears to be researching facial recognition technologies for televisions, it looks like Sony is going to be the first to release a product with these capabilities.  Read More
Printing pills to order will mean safer and faster-acting medicines
Compressed tablets are the most popular dosage form in use today. About two-thirds of all prescriptions are dispensed as solid dosage forms and half of these are compressed tablets. What may surprise many people is that nearly 99.9 percent of most prescription tablets are actually filler. The active ingredient is usually just one thousandth of a pill, so it has to be mixed with other ingredients to make the medicine big enough to pick up and swallow. The second thing that may surprise you is that the underlying production process has remained largely unchanged for over a thousand years ... though quality assurance is a lot better these days. Now researchers are looking at a fundamental shift in methodology which promises to create safer and faster-acting medicines – "printing" pills to order.  Read More

Prof. Shmuel Peleg, of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem
If there’s one job on CSI that doesn’t look like much fun (besides boiling the flesh off human heads), it’s having to watch hours upon hours of surveillance camera footage in the hopes of seeing some kind of clue. In real life, footage sometimes ends up going unwatched because there are simply not enough man-hours in which to do it. Even when there is, studies have shown that viewers’ attention starts to decline within 20 minutes when watching such videos. Fortunately, new software developed at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem can help with this problem.  Read More
The SCARAB Police Chase Assistant concept
You’ve gotta hand it to Industrial Design students. They have the youth and imagination to come up with some really intriguing ideas, along with the skills and tools to give us tantalizing glimpses of what those ideas might actually look like. Case in point: The Milwaukee Institute of Art and Design’s recent graduate Carl Archambeault, and his Scarab concept.  Read More
The Joby Gorillatorch Flare
Last August, we told you about the wonderfully-named Joby Gorillatorch. It’s an LED lamp mounted on a Gorillapod tripod, the bendy, knobby, magnet-tipped legs of which allow it to be mounted almost anywhere - it can wrap around branches, cling to a car’s fender, or hang from the inside of a tent. Now, Joby has announced that the Gorillatorch is being joined by a souped-up big brother... the Gorillatorch Flare.  Read More
Team PrISUm is currently putting the final touches to its Anthelion solar vehicle, with hi...
A team of Iowa State University students are busy putting the finishing touches to a solar-powered vehicle before setting off on a thousand mile race. Using computer-aided design and some novel engineering techniques, the students' three wheel craft weighs half that of previous creations and sports over 500 solar cells. Hopes are high for a winning result in the forthcoming American Solar Challenge.  Read More
Forty-five new radioisotopes found at Japan's heavy-ion accelerator facility
From RIKEN Research in Japan comes news today that 45 new radioisotopes have been discovered in just four days, more than the world's scientists typically find in an average year.  Read More
Audi's travolution project sets up a dialogue between vehicles and traffic lights
Traffic lights are an essential part of keeping chaos at bay on our city streets, but the idea didn't exactly get off to a flying start. The first gas-lit traffic light appeared outside the British Houses of Parliament in London in December 1868 but exploded two months later (which was bad news for the policeman operating it) and when the first electric lights appeared in the U.S. in 1912, apparently no-one wanted to stop for a “flashing bird house.” Gradually the technology improved and interconnected lights that could be automatically rather than manually controlled appeared in the 1920s. Now we could be seeing another great leap forward - traffic lights that talk to cars. That's the basis of Audi's travolution project which sets up a dialogue between vehicles and traffic lights in order to keep traffic flowing, save fuel, reduce emissions and possibly help keep drivers saner in the process.  Read More
Orange Power Wellies - power collected in the power generating sole is generated via a pro...
European Telco Orange is showing off an interesting phone charging prototype – a set of Wellington Boots with a ‘power generating sole’ that converts heat from your feet into electrical power to charge your battery-powered handhelds. You'll need to walk for twelve hours in your “Orange Power Wellies” to get an hour of battery life but we still think it's remarkable that such significant amounts of energy can be harvested from normal human activity. In order to decrease the length of time you need to charge your phone, try dancing or running, because the hotter your feet get, the more energy you produce.  Read More
Holomagic iPhone flash Photography Case
The new iPhone 4 finally has an LED flash but that hasn't stopped a bunch of manufacturers such as Quirky and Snapturelabs creating accessories for prior models. We saw another ripping contender at Computex last week in the form of the Holomagic which puts out an intense light from an LED from a battery case with plenty (285 mAh) of battery life and a choice of leather or plastic protective cases too.  Read More
Adobe Lightroom 3: New features introduced since the public beta
If you’re a fan of Adobe’s indispensable digital darkroom software, Lightroom then chances are you might have already had a nose around some of its new features and improvements in the beta. Although most of the major updates were introduced during this public pre-release we’re pleased to say a few more features have come to light in the final version announced today.  Read More
ISIS overcomes the shortfalls of traditional fish-eye surveillance cameras to provide perf...
It might be a sad indictment on today’s society but surveillance cameras are an increasingly common sight on city streets around the world. Most of these systems employ a fish-eye lens to capture a wide field of view, but such lenses distort the image and can only provide limited resolution. A new video surveillance system currently being developed by the Department of Homeland Security’s Science and Technology Directorate (S&T) overcomes these shortfalls to provide perfectly detailed, edge-to-edge images that could prove to be of great assistance to law enforcement.  Read More

 
Researchers at Boston College have developed a high efficiency nanoscale thin solar cell b...
Traditionally, the goal of high power conversion efficiency in thin film solar cells has been compromised by opposing optical and electrical constraints – while a cell needs to be thick enough to absorb adequate amounts of light, it must also be thin enough for the extraction of current. Rising to this “thick and thin” challenge, researchers at Boston College have designed a nanoscale solar cell based on the age-old technology that created the coaxial cable, promising a higher conversion efficiency than any thin film solar cell yet seen.  Read More
Michelin releases free sustainable mobility book - Driving in the future
The Michelin Challenge Bibendum has just finished its tenth staging in Brazil, and thanks to championing what was an unfashionable cause when it started, has become the major annual sustainable mobility event as environmental concerns have grown. One of the highlights of the event this year was Michelin's release of a 145 page book entitled “Driving in the future – towards sustainable road mobility” and it's a great resource for understanding the challenges we face collectively, and the ways in which are likely to overcome them. Even better news is that you can download the entire book for free in PDF format and that it's available in English, French and Portuguese.  Read More
The GT3 three-wheeled electric vehicle from T3 Motion
With its T3 Series electric standup vehicle (ESV), California-based company T3 Motion took aim at the police, security and site management markets with a no-noise, no-pollution, fast-response, one-person vehicle that delivers long battery run time, short recharge time and operating costs of around 10 cents per day. It expanded its line up with the four-wheel CT Micro Car that is designed to service similar markets to the T3 Series ESV. Now the company is adding to its fleet with the GT3, a two-passenger, plug-in consumer electric vehicle that features a single, wide-stance, rear wheel with two tires sharing one rim.  Read More
The Bumblebee City Nesters
A competition in London has designers vying for the attentions of a type of lodger not usually considered when drawing up the plans for a hotel: insects. British Land and the City of London Corporation chose to celebrate the year of biodiversity by holding a competition to see who could design the best "hotel" for insects. It's narrowed the list of entrants down to five finalists, with one winner to be selected by public vote and another to be selected by a panel of experts.  Read More
Place a document, photo or real object underneath the overhead camera module and the digit...
If you find yourself going to meetings, presentations or trade shows a lot then DocExpress from Taiwan's New Image could just help ease the burden of carrying away reams of paper handouts. Instead of lugging all that paper around, pop the document, photograph or even real object under the high speed, portable document camera solution and zap a digitized version instead. The solution can even be used to project, copy, fax, email or record images or video.  Read More
Intelligent Energy CEO, Dr. Henri Winand with London Deputy Mayor, Kit Malthouse, at unvei...
Two years ago we reported that London’s iconic black cabs would be getting a green makeover with a fleet to be fitted out with zero local emissions hydrogen fuel cell power systems in time for the Olympics in 2012. Now the first prototype fuel cell black cab has been unveiled. It is powered by hydrogen fuel system hybridized with lithium polymer batteries that allow the vehicle to operate for a full day without the need for refueling.  Read More
Example of test results for the A  blood group
A study by Australian scientists has resulted in the development of a test for blood type that can be performed using antibody impregnated paper manufacturable for a few cents per test, which is significantly cheaper than existing tests of a similar nature. This could make all the difference in the developing world, considering it's essential to test for blood type before performing a blood transfusion on a patient whose blood type is unknown. The test essentially allows blood type to be determined based on the distance the blood travels along the channels in the paper from the point where it is dropped.  Read More
The WeGo integrates GPS satellite navigation and a HUD in an all-in-one design
Head-up displays (HUDs) first appeared on production vehicles way back in the late 1980’s, and add-on HUDs have been around for quite a while too - and not just for cars but also for motorbike helmets. But Taiwan-based Springteq says its WeGo HUD Navigator is the first product to integrate GPS satellite navigation and a HUD in an all-in-one design. The device projects navigation information onto the windshield to provide a virtual readout out that appears roughly one meter (3.3-feet) in front of the driver.  Read More
Team Baby Bubbler: Michael Pandya, Jocelyn Brown, Katie Schnelle, Haruka Maruyama and Jose...
You can’t not like an invention called the Baby Bubbler. Even if it were called the Pontiac Aztek, you’d still have to like it, as it’s doubtless going to save many young lives. A team of five seniors from Houston’s Rice University developed the Bubbler, officially known as the Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) device, for use on infants with respiratory infections in developing nations. Given that around 20 percent of deaths in children under five are caused by lower respiratory infections, that could make for a whole lot of saved babies.  Read More
The polymer-based filter blocks oil and allows water through
With the damaged Deepwater Horizon oil well continuing to spew oil into the Gulf of Mexico there’s no shortage of suggestions coming from those concerned about the environmental disaster. We’ve already looked at a number of clean-up options, and now a University of Pittsburgh engineering professor has developed a technique that looks very promising. His filter for separating oil from water not only cleans the water, but also allows the oil to be recovered and stored for the use BP originally intended and the filter to be reused.  Read More

1 comment:

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