New and Emerging Technology News part 103 ~ NEW GEN TECH LIFE : new generation technology news

Wednesday, 29 January 2014

New and Emerging Technology News part 103

Nintendo 3DS will stream movies from Netflix
With the Nintendo 3DS release date fast approaching, Nintendo's keynote address at the Game Developers Conference in San Francisco was an opportunity to showcase more of what we can expect from the new handheld. The most connected Nintendo device ever released according to company President Satoru Iwata, the 3DS will incorporate Netflix video streaming and gain access to over 10000 AT&T wireless hot spots across the United States.  Read More
Bolefloor floorboards follow the natural curve of the tree from which they are cut
There was also a time when wood was relatively cheap and plentiful in much of the world thanks to the number of trees just standing around waiting to be turned into useful things like floorboards. Unfortunately wood is neither as cheap nor plentiful as it once was, so it’s important to make the most of every tree. Instead of following the traditional line of straight-edged floorboards, Dutch company Bolefloor maximizes the coverage area of floorboards made from a particular tree by following the tree's natural curves.  Read More
The Digital Observatory for Protected Areas (DOPA) has been developed to allow researchers...
Thousands of organizations around the world are working towards protection of ecosystems, yet the sharing of data is extremely limited and often localized – swathes of information that could be important are unknown, unpublicized and from a global perspective, wasted. The Digital Observatory for Protected Areas (DOPA), developed by the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF), could pave the way for a new era of understanding. It aims to bring together multidisciplinary data allowing researchers and decision-makers the means to assess, monitor and forecast protected areas globally.  Read More
The Semper Vivus comes on stage in Geneva
We’re a little non-plussed on Porsche’s announcement of a reconstructed Semper Vivus, which it is claiming was presented at the Paris Show of 1900. There’s a video of the construction of the vehicle, but the scant info available is at odds with previous Porsche historic information on the Lohner Porsche and the normally fastidious Porsche press department hasn’t issued any details of the Semper Vivus yet. The Semper Vivus was a series electric hybrid with its two engines charging the batteries and Porsche electric hub motors delivering the power. It must be said the Porsche execs looked anything but comfortable driving the Semper on stage.  Read More
The 1100 bhp Koenigsegg Agera R
Christian von Koenigsegg has once again created a hypercar of the highest order – the new Agera R is capable of approaching 400 km/h and features so much innovation that we’re not going to even attempt to squeeze it all into the introductory paragraph. The 5 litre V8 bi-turbo engine is the lightest and most compact hypercar engine in the world, and produces 1100 hp on E85 bio fuel with peak torque of 1200 Nm spread over over a 3300 rpm rev range. It’s most notable feature though, is a Thule Roof Box which ensures you can take all your gear as well as having a show car with the standard roof when you get there.  Read More
The display itself was arranged by Dutch artist Paul Veroude and definitely fits into the ...
One of the most remarkable things we’ve seen in a long time is this deconstructed 2010 F1 car on display at Mercedes-Benz World in Surrey, UK. The Mercedes GP Petronas F1 comprises 3200 components and every one of them is hung in the display. The display itself was arranged by Dutch artist Paul Veroude and definitely fits into the “how can you do that?” category. Its subject is equally as fascinating, accounting for 90,000 man hours of design time, 200,000 man hours of manufacturing manifested as 600 kg finished form manufactured to the most exacting tolerances of the world’s most exotic substances - carbon fiber, titanium, aluminum and magnesium. To look at, the car is predominantly carbon fiber (85% by volume) but it’s so light that it accounts for only 30% of the mass.  Read More
Pininfarina 2uettottanta and Range Rover Evoque take car design awards
There is no greater accolade than to be judged the finest by your peers. This year the car design fraternity has delivered an overwhelming verdict for the concept design of the year to the Pininfarina – 40% of all the voters (all car designers) voted for the Pininfarina 2uettottanta ahead of some quite outstanding competition in the form of the Jaguar C-X75 and Renault DeZir. The Car Design of the Year 2010 Production category gong went to Range Rover's Evoque ahead of the Alfa Romeo Giulietta and Audi A7.  Read More
The LA bike plan includes the Backbone, Neighborhood, and Green (scenic) networks
As the Missing Persons song goes, “nobody walks in LA.” But with the release of the 2010 Los Angeles Bicycle Plan, the city hopes to make it easier to ride there. As part of the city’s commitment to transform LA from an auto-centric metropolis to a city with a multi-modal transportation system, the City of Los Angeles has released the draft 2010 Los Angeles Bicycle Plan, which designates 1680 miles (2700 km) of bikeway facilities and proposes three new bicycle networks that will crisscross the city.  Read More
ASUS' gaming wing, the Republic of Gamers, has revealed its new line-up of notebooks, main...
ASUS Republic of Gamers came out in force at CeBIT 2011 to launch some new additions to its gaming range. On show were some new notebooks, a couple of motherboards, graphics cards, a 3D monitor, a router and some headsets. Features of note include a wide-viewing-angle, glasses-free 3D experience from one of the notebooks, XONAR audio and 802.11n on a Black Edition mainboard, and a Wireless-N router that can support simultaneous connections for lag-free, online gaming.  Read More
The Elfoid P1 is a combination mobile phone and mini telepresence robot, designed to give ...
We can’t say we weren’t warned. Last August, Japan’s Eager Co. Ltd. announced that it was planning to begin sales of the Telenoid R1 telepresence robot in October. The toddler-sized ghostly-looking robot is intended to be a physical stand-in for a remote user during internet communications, mirroring that person’s movements via real-time face tracking software on their computer – their voice also comes out of the device. Well, Telenoid now has a little sibling. The Elfoid P1, as it’s called, was unveiled at a press conference yesterday in Japan, and is intended to serve as a combination mobile phone and mini telepresence robot.  Read More

Engineers from the Bristol wing of the European Aeronautic Defence and Space Company (EADS...
Engineers from the Bristol wing of the European Aeronautic Defence and Space Company (EADS) have announced the development of the first bicycle using Additive Layer Manufacturing (ALM) technology. The manufacturing process involves "growing" the components from a fine nylon powder, similar in concept to 3D printing. Said to be as strong as steel, the end product is claimed to contain only a fraction of the source material used by traditional machining, and the process results in much less waste. It also has the potential to take manufacture to precisely where the component or product is needed, instead of being confined to factories often located a great distance away.  Read More
Charlie Sheen’s meteoric rise to Twitter God status - after one week he's 58th with a bull...
Charlie Sheen it seems, does not do things by halves. Within a week of opening his Twitter account, he’s being followed by 2.2 million people and creating some serious personal "share of attention" in the entertainment world. He's poised to race past Time magazine, People, the New York Times and the NBA and Irish bookmakers are now taking bets on just how far Charlie's record-breaking following will grow. Amazingly, the oddson a range of special bets and achievements are quite short that Sheen will be close to the top 10 most powerful Twitter opinion makers in the world - perhaps even at number one.  Read More
MEV's Mini-Seven gets the youngsters around town in style
If your kids are always running late for school then this little number might be just the transport option to ensure they arrive on time. Made by Micro Electric Vehicles (MEV), the Mini Seven is a hand-built, proportionally accurate child’s motorized car that is a slight departure from MEV’s other vehicles, which are powered by electric motors, as it is powered by a small petrol Honda HP motor that can propel the Mini Seven to 19 mph (30 km/h).  Read More
Concordia University professor, Benjamin Fung, has developed an effective new technique to...
There might be many harmless reasons for sending anonymous emails – confessing your undying love for someone, seeking anonymous advice, or simply playing a joke on a friend – but there are also plenty of harmful reasons – making threats against someone, distributing child pornography or sending viruses, just to name a few. While police can often use the IP address to locate where an email originated, it may be harder to nail down exactly who sent it. A team of researchers claims to have developed an effective new technique to determine the authorship of anonymous emails that can provide presentable evidence in courts of law.  Read More
Philips new Cinema 21:9 Gold Series LED TV
Anyone who thought making the switch from their old 4:3 analogue TV to a 16:9 widescreen digital model would mean the end of unsightly black bars at the top and bottom of the picture will likely have discovered otherwise – particularly if they also picked up a Blu-ray player along with the new TV. With most movies filmed in the wider 2.35:1 or 2.40:1 and many of these now available on Blu-ray, cinephiles are once again faced with the choice of viewing the entire image with black bars, or zooming or stretching the image so it fills the entire screen. The new Cinema 21:9 Gold Series LED TV from Philips solves this dilemma with its 21:9 aspect ratio allowing widescreen movies to be displayed in all their glory.  Read More
The homemade sled-and-rider-towing winch (Photo: Josh Smith)
Sledding can be a lot of fun, but pulling your toboggan, inner tube or sled back up the hill ... well, that isn’t part of the fun. Yes, it definitely is good exercise, but it’s not fun. While the rest of us just quietly resign ourselves to the long climb back up, however, Pennsylvania’s Josh Smith did something about it – he built his own powered sled-and-rider-towing winch.  Read More
At night, multi-color lighting enhances the beauty of the Treepods structures
Heading away from the use of polluting fossil fuels towards sustainable clean energy, we are discovering more and more novel ways to use or harness the wind. Even though solar panels have become almost commonplace, we're still seeing the technology being pushed into new ground. More projects are surfacing that harvest energy from the oceans. Meanwhile, we're also coming up with inventive ways to monitor pollution. Now an initiative from Mario Caceres and Cristian Canonico of the Influx Studio in Paris, working with SHIFTboston, is looking to roll out a man-made forest of air-cleaning Treepods throughout Boston ... which are powered by solar and kinetic energy.  Read More
Philip Pauley's proposed Pathfinder submarines would be able to crawl along the sea floor,...
The Transatlantic Seafloor Research Challenge is not a real competition, but that hasn't stopped British designer Philip Pauley from envisioning it, and the watercraft that would take part in it. If it were to exist, the challenge would require underwater vehicles to cross from the UK to the US using whatever route their team members thought was the quickest, but they would have to stay in physical contact with the sea floor for as much of the distance as possible. Pauley's Pathfinder submarines would be equipped with wheels or tracks for trundling along the bottom on most of the crossing, but would also theoretically be able to propel themselves up through the water when necessary.  Read More
Pure PC has created an open design luxury PC that is described as a work of art, which com...
While the various flavors of games console have introduced gaming to the living room, the weapon of choice for most serious gamers is the PC. Not many would settle for an off-the-shelf gaming PC like the one in front of me, opting for a self build or custom model instead. Those who fall in the latter group will definitely be interested in the Luxury edition gaming PC from Pure PC. Benefiting from an open design that's said to help dissipate heat without the need for too many noisy fans, the high-end gaming rig is powered by a Core i7 chip which can be overclocked to 5GHz, at least two NVIDIA graphics cards and up to 24GB of memory. There's a choice of twin SSD or dual HDD storage, USB 2.0 and USB 3.0 connectivity and a Blu-ray burner. So how much would such a system cost? Read on to find out ...  Read More
 
German engineers have developed a low-cost disposable endoscopic camera that is the size o...
Tiny video cameras mounted on the end of long thin fiber optic cables, commonly known as endoscopes, have proven invaluable to doctors and researchers wishing to peer inside the human body. Endoscopes can be rather pricey, however, and like anything else that gets put inside peoples’ bodies, need to be sanitized after each use. A newly-developed type of endoscope is claimed to address those drawbacks by being so inexpensive to produce that it can be thrown away after each use. Not only that, but it also features what is likely the world’s smallest complete video camera, which is just one cubic millimeter in size.  Read More
Researchers have succeeded in producing isobutanol directly from cellulosic plant matter s...
With the situation in Libya causing a spike in fuel prices worldwide there's some good biofuel-related news out of the U.S. Department of Energy's BioEnergy Science Center (BESC) that could help to reduce many countries' dependence on oil imports. For the first time, BESC researchers have succeeded in producing isobutanol directly from cellulosic plant matter using bacteria. Being a higher grade of alcohol than ethanol, isobutanol holds particular promise as a gasoline replacement as it can be burned in regular car engines with a heat value similar to gasoline.  Read More
The fuselage for the first P-8A Poseidon production aircraft. The sixth test aircraft T6 i...
Final assembly of the first U.S. Navy P-8A Poseidon production aircraft is underway. The Boeing 737-800 derivative which will replace the P-3 Orion as an anti-submarine and long-range surveillance aircraft has been undergoing airborne testing since 2009 and delivery of the production aircraft is set to begin in 2012.  Read More
Hydrogen has great potential as a clean fuel source for powering our cars and airplanes, but it also poses some big hurdles – in particular, how to store it. Making practical use of hydrogen in gas or liquid form raises difficulties in terms of volume and pressurization – a hydrogen gas tank for a car would need to be around four times larger than current petroleum tanks. Another possible solution is the use of solid state hydrogen and the European Aeronautic Defense and Space Company (EADS), along with the University of Glasgow, hope to boost this approach by developing a new storage system using materials modified at the nanoscale that receive and release the hydrogen at a faster rate.  Read More
Warner Bros. is the first Hollywood studio to offer movies directly through Facebook
Warner Bros. is hoping to leverage the popularity of social networking juggernaut Facebook by becoming the first Hollywood studio to offer movies directly through the site. Facebook users will be able to purchase and rent titles from the Warner Bros. catalog using Facebook Credits and play, pause and resume the movies through their Facebook account for up to 48 hours from the time of purchase. An initial test offering of The Dark Night to fans who “Liked” said movie on Facebook can now rent the title through the movie’s official Facebook page, with additional titles to be made available in the coming months.  Read More
The Intel SSD 510 Series solid-state drive
As solid-state drives (SSDs) continue to drop in price they also continue to improve in performance. A perfect example is Intel's latest SSD 510 Series, which improves upon the company's previous X25-M SSD by adding SATA 6 Gbps performance to take advantage of the higher SATA bus interfaces found on recently introduced 2nd Generation Core processor-based platforms. This allows the 510 Series to boast sequential read speeds of up to 500 MB/s – double that of Intel's current 3 Gbps SSDs – and sequential write speeds of up to 315 MB/s – more than triple that of its current SSDs.  Read More
The new Radeon HD 6990 GPU from AMD is claimed to be the fastest single graphics card in t...
Not too long ago, we were all salivating at the release of NVIDIA's GTX 580 graphics card and scrambling to make the most of the world's fastest Direct X GPU. Now AMD has bounced back with the announcement that its new Radeon HD 6990 card has beaten NVIDIA's 3DMark 11 performance score in industry standard benchmark testing for a single graphics card. AMD says that its new powerhouse GPU is able to automatically unlock higher clock speeds, features technology aimed at giving gamers the best possible visual experience, and supports a number of different display options, including expanding the field of view over five monitors with Eyefinity technology.  Read More
The endocardial balloon catheter with a stretchable array of sensors and electrodes, desig...
When a patient has an arrhythmia (an irregular heartbeat), cardiologists will often treat the disorder by inserting two tube-like catheters into the patient’s heart. The first catheter is used for mapping out the heart tissue, identifying the location of cells that are causing the arrhythmia. The second catheter, which has an electrode on the end, is then directed to those locations, where it kills the aberrant cells in a process known as ablation. Scientists have recently developed a single catheter with added stretchable electronics, however, that does both jobs in one step.  Read More
Tristan Lawry's ultrasonic system is theoretically able to transmit data and power through...
Given the deepwater working conditions endured by submarines, one of the last things most people would want to do is drill holes through their hulls. That’s exactly what is necessary, however, to allow power and data to flow to and from audio and other sensors mounted on the exterior of the vessels. Not only do these holes present a leakage risk, but they also diminish the hull’s structural integrity, and the submarine must be hoisted into drydock in order for any new sensors to be added. Now, a doctoral student at New York’s Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) has come up with a method of using ultrasound to transmit power and data wirelessly through a sub’s thick metal hull – no holes required.  Read More
Olivetti has announced Italy's first entry into the tablet market - the Android-based OliP...
My very first electronic typewriter was made by Olivetti. It was a sturdy beast and quite the reliable performer. So, it's good to see that the Telecom Italia-owned company is keeping up with the times as it announces the release of Italy's first tablet computer – the OliPad 100. The 10-inch Android tablet is powered by NVIDIA's Tegra 2 platform, has Bluetooth, 3G, Wi-Fi, and sports SD card expansion if its 16GB of onboard memory proves to be too restrictive.  Read More

Ford’s electric Comuta Concept – 43 years after its debut
It’s extraordinary what pops up in the in-box each week. Those with a keen eye for fashion will note that the picture is from the sixties – the Ford Comuta was a concept presented at the Geneva Motor Show in 1967. It was all-electric, had a top speed of 40 mph and a range of 40 miles, and that was 40 years ago. The upcoming electric Ford Focus has more than double the range (160 km) and double the top speed of 84 mph (135 km/h), but surely the Comuta is worth digging out of the archives for a second look. With modern motors and advanced controllers and high density batteries, the Comuta might be quite suitable for European cities such as London where road speeds haven’t progressed much since the horse and cart.  Read More
A pharmacy robot selecting medication (Photo: Susan Merrell/UCSF)
The University of California at San Francisco Medical Center is now starting to use robots, not humans, to dispense medication from its hospital pharmacy. While robots are often brought into workplaces as a cost-cutting measure, UCSF claims that in this case, it's to minimize the chances of patients receiving the wrong medication. So far, it seems to be working out well – out of 350,000 doses of oral and injectable medication prepared to date, not a single error has occurred.  Read More
A microchannel created using the laser scribing technique (Photo: Purdue University School...
A new manufacturing method that incorporates laser technology may result in thin film solar panels that are less expensive and more efficient than anything presently on the market. Currently, a stylus is used to mechanically etch microchannels into such panels, which electrically connect the individual solar cells and allow them to form an array. Researchers from Indiana’s Purdue University, however, are developing a technique in which an ultrafast pulsing laser is used to do the etching. Not only will it hopefully be quicker and cheaper than mechanical “scribing,” but it should also produce cleaner, sharper microchannels that offer superior performance.  Read More
Roland has announced the latest evolutionary leap in the world of guitar synth technology:...
In the late seventies, Roland took the sonic palette available to keyboard players and opened it up to guitarists, with the introduction on the GR-500. It was quite simply a marvel, but is positively primitive when compared to the latest evolutionary leap taken by the company with the GR-55 guitar synthesizer. Featuring a pair of independent synthesizer sound engines and a Composite Object Sound Modeling (COSM) engine, the device makes hundreds of different sounds available to the player – anything from pianos to strings, drums to synths, various acoustic and electric guitar and bass emulations, as well as numerous amplifiers.  Read More
Inventor Simon Williams and his Deliver-E Trike
When those of us who live in urban areas picture letter carriers – or posties, or mailmen/women – we usually think of them as people who deliver the mail by foot. The fact is, however, letter carriers in much of the world use small motorcycles to make their deliveries. If Australian inventor Simon Williams has his way, many of those motorcycles may soon be replaced by his electric three-wheeler. Not only is the Williams Deliver-E Trike quieter and cleaner than gas-powered bikes, but its two rear swing arms pivot independently, allowing the vehicle to lean into turns and stand upright when parked at the side of a sloping road.  Read More
The Logitech Z906 TXH-Certified surround sound speaker system
Logitech has announced that its veteran digital 5.1 speaker system, the highly regarded Z-5500, is to be retired and replaced by a newer model at the end of the month. On the face of it, the upgrades to the new Z906 system appear to be purely cosmetic. It offers similar specs to its ancestor but loses out slightly on the total RMS output, although Logitech says that it will still shake your house. The system benefits from multi-source simultaneous digital and analog input, wire-free remote and room-filling Dolby and DTS surround sound technology.  Read More
The iconic iPod
The iPod celebrates its ten year anniversary in 2011. Since its launch on Oct 23rd 2001, six generations of the device have been produced, with more than 300 million units sold of the various iterations. On September 1, 2010 Apple announced updates to the entire iPod line – with the sole exception of the iPod Classic. Some are wondering whether this could mean the end of the product that sparked Apple's resurgence.  Read More
A unique system allows users of the Swiss Voltitude pedelec bike to fold or unfold it in o...
Last January, we said that the Robrady-designed db0 was one of the best folding electric bikes we'd seen. The Swiss entry into the market has turned its back on this traditional bicycle-with-motor design in favor of a folding pedal-electric assist scooter. Users are said to be able to fold or unfold the Voltitude bike in about one second, and with one hand, thanks to its unique EasyFold system. Swiss and EU legislation limits the electric assist to 15.5 mph (25 kph), although some frantic footwork could see it achieve faster speeds if required, and the onboard battery is good for between 12 and 25 miles (20 to 40 km) between charges.  Read More
The kind of spotless image that caused solar physicists to ask 'where have all the sunpsot...
Direct observation of sunspots has, more or less, been going on continuously since they were first observed in the seventeenth century. So, you can imagine the puzzled expressions on the faces of astronomers the world over when the phenomena all-but disappeared from view for a couple of years recently. Now, research sponsored by NASA and the government of India has produced the first computer model that explains the prolonged cyclic minima during 2008 - 2009. The simulations suggest that plasma currents deep inside the sun interfered with the formation of sunspots.  Read More
The x-Ar exoskeletal arm support makes life easier for people whose work requires them to ...
If you’ve seen Avatar or Aliens, then you’ve seen futuristic versions of exoskeletons – mechanical systems that human users wear over their bodies, to augment their own physical abilities. While exoskeletons are already available and in use today, they’re sometimes a bit more machine than what is needed. After all, why put on an expensive full- or half-body contraption, when you’re performing a task that mostly just requires the use of one arm? That’s where the x-Ar exoskeletal arm support comes in. Users wear it on their dominant arm, and it moves with them, providing support as they do things such as holding tools out in front of themselves.  Read More

Scientists have created a nanoscale piston that is capable of self-assembly (Image: Ivan H...
Just like a regular-sized device requires a regular-sized motor to operate, a nanodevice likewise requires a molecular-scale motor. In some cases, that motor takes the form of a piston, and building a piston that’s just a few nanometers long ... well, it’s pretty hard. It can and has been done, but it’s an extremely fiddly process. Now, scientists from France’s Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) and the Universit√© de Bordeaux, along with colleagues in China, have developed a molecular piston that is capable of assembling itself.  Read More
Stealth Computer has taken some of its rugged industrial PC know-how and developed an all-...
Stealth Computer has taken some of its rugged industrial PC know-how and developed an all-in-one solution for interactive kiosks, outdoor computing, or marine, aviation, security and industrial environments. The SVPC's panel is sealed against windblown dust and rain, splashing and hose-directed water, comes in three screen size options and benefits from touchscreen user interaction. The PC part of the package offers dual-core processing, HDD or SSD storage and sports a multitude of I/O connectivity options.  Read More
The Fling is an analog joystick that can be attached to the screen of an iPad, for better ...
Although it's pretty impressive how the screen content of an iPad can be manipulated entirely by touchscreen, one need look no farther than the popularity of Bluetooth keypads to see that sometimes users want separate physical controls. Now gamers-on-the-go can buy gizmos that allow them to play their iPad-based games in a way that offers much more control than simply sliding their finger back and forth on glass – the latest of these tablet joysticks to cross our desk is Ten One Design's Fling.  Read More
Texas Tech University has created an online world map that details the aftershocks of the ...
Almost incomprehensible as the devastation from last Friday’s earthquake and tsunami in Japan has been, scientists warn that more aftershocks are on their way. In order to get all the information on current seismic activity in one place, researchers at Texas Tech University’s Center for Geospatial Technologies have developed an online, publicly-accessible world map that displays data on disturbances worldwide, almost as soon as they have occurred.  Read More
Researchers from the University of Illinois have developed a new low-power digital memory ...
Researchers from the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department of the University of Illinois have developed a new low-power digital memory which uses much less power and is faster than other solutions currently available. The breakthrough could give future consumer devices like smartphones and laptops a much longer battery life, but might also benefit equipment used in telecommunications, science or by the military.  Read More
Research published in the journal of the American Chemical Society claims that mashed up p...
The skin of a banana has been used to great comic effects in numerous slapstick routines for many years. It's also good for the skin and is a traditional cure for warts. You can polish shoes and silver with it. You can make wine with it and it's even been known to find itself being dried, wrapped in paper and smoked. Now, research published in the journal of the American Chemical Society claims that mashed up peel can remove heavy metals from river water.  Read More
The M division-designed BMW M Bike Carbon Racer
While it might be better known for vehicles of the motorized variety, for over 60 years BMW has also been manufacturing a range of high-end bicycles. The company’s new 2011 range provides something for everyone – or at least everyone with a well stocked wallet – with a Cruise Bike, Touring Bike and a couple of mountain bikes. And for the first time BMW has extended its M Series branding to its two-wheeled vehicles, but despite the M standing for Motorsport it’s not for a motorbike, but rather the new 2011 BMW M Bike Carbon Racer bicycle.  Read More
EV charging station locations near Mountain View CA.
One of the big advantages of driving fossil fuel-powered vehicles is that it's easy to find a place to fill up. In the more than a century since the world's first purpose-built gas station was built in St. Louis, Missouri in 1905, a massive worldwide infrastructure has emerged to keep our vehicles running. As automakers make the move to electric vehicles, early adopters are faced with a lack of infrastructure to keep batteries charged, however, the number of public EV charging stations is steadily growing and Google is now doing its bit to help make tracking them down easier by adding EV charging station location information to Google Maps.  Read More
Aikiuo interactive bowl for dogs
Long before before the days of canned food and canine coffee, dogs had to work for their supper. Stimulating these natural hunting and foraging instincts is an important part of keeping your pet healthy and happy – as well as preventing your Chesterfield lounge from being torn to shreds – and this "interactive dog food dish" is designed to do just that. The paw-shaped Aikiou (pronounced "IQ") bowl is made up of a series of compartments with sliding covers where food can be concealed, turning mealtime from a slobbering free-for-all into an entertaining and challenging exercise that will help keep Fido's mind and body fit.  Read More
Yikebike's ingenious range extender
The Yikebike is a miniature, electric penny farthing made of carbon fiber and now it's on sale, it is quickly gathering a cult early-adopter following thanks to its weight of 10.8 kilograms, that it folds so small it can fit in a backpack, and that it will run at 25km/h (15 mph). Until now, it has ticked all the boxes except one - its limited range of just 10 kilometers. Now it has released an extender battery pack so you can add additional 10 kilometer increments to the range of your YikeBike. Each battery costs US$195 and weighs 1.95kg and there's a special backpack to carry multiple batteries so it becomes a very practical solution that offers the Yikebike unsurpassed bang-per-kilogram and versatility as a commuting appliance. Though it's hard to equate the US$3600 price tag with primary transport, the addition of a Yikebike to any automobile storage compartment significantly extends the capabilities of both vehicles. The facility to carry secondary transportation inside cars has been explored many times in recent years by Honda and Ford in particular … and it makes a lot of sense.  Read More

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